Is this a joke, or are these people just completely incompetent?

Oh, this is no joke.

What we have here is a combination of “racism fever,” complete incompetence, and sheer stupidity.

Laura Italiano of The New York Post writes, “The Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History & Culture has a little-known but controversial section on ‘whiteness’ that is creating a stir on Twitter.”

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I would say “creating a stir” is an odd choice of words.

Please continue with the rest of the blog, and then think about what these actions and statements cause you to think.

“The museum’s online description of the exhibit was tweeted out on Wednesday by Byron York, chief political correspondent for the Washington Examiner.”

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‘“The National Museum of African American History & Culture wants to make you aware of certain signs of “whiteness:” Individualism, hard work, objectivity, the nuclear family, progress, respect for authority, delayed gratification, and more,’ York tweeted.”

Yes…, much more.

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“In an Examiner opinion piece on Thursday, York pointed out the oddity of so many universally positive attributes being ascribed to ‘whiteness.’”

‘“Most of the attributes listed seem to be a recipe for success for anyone,’ he wrote.”

‘“Certainly, millions of black Americans work hard every day, respect individual effort, plan for the future, are polite to others, and so on.  It seems odd to attribute that to “whiteness,” as opposed to, say, the everyday values of trying to lead a successful life.’”

Saying this is “odd” is quite an understatement.

These black Americans are obviously all “Uncle Toms and Aunt Jemimas,” Mr. York, and would not really be considered “black” by the likes of the NAACP, Al Sharpton, Colin Kaepernick, or even Joe Biden.

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‘“Yet according to the National Museum of African American History & Culture, “whiteness” it is.’”

“The original tweet had been retweeted, and liked, more than 22,000 times by Thursday afternoon.”

Who are these people “liking” this completely racist, bigoted and brainless determinations, be they white, black, or whatever?!

‘“Not gonna lie, they nailed us in the food section: “bland is best,”’ Washington Post data reporter and self-described ‘Born-again Minnesotan’ Christopher Ingraham quipped in response.”

I’m not gonna lie either…, you’re an idiot, Mr. Ingraham.

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When you were “born-again,” were you born without a brain?

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I can’t even begin to comment on the level of assumed stereotypical stupidness and self-importance that it took to make that comment.

Here we have ONE stupid white guy out of 220 MILLION white people, and he presumes to stereotype us all and speak for the entire white population.

All I can say is his level of stupidity is quite impressive.

BUT HE IS NOWHERE, NOWHERE NEAR THE LEVEL OF STUPIDITY DEMONSTRATED BY THESE SMITHSONIAN NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY & CULTURE PEOPLE!!!

Do these people working there have ANY qualifications?

Seriously.

Actually, I’m sure they all have very impressive educational resumes…, but what does that tell you about our institutions of “higher” learning?

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“On Thursday, York noted that the DC museum, one of the most successful in the Smithsonian system (at least with all of the liberal tools), gets $33 million in federal funding (I’m paying for this!) and has been supported by ‘the Lilly Endowment, the Oprah Winfrey Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, American Express, Bank of America, 3M, Boeing, Michael Jordan, Kaiser Permanente, the Rockefeller Foundation, Target, UnitedHealth, Walmart, and many more.’”

You can’t get much more politically correct than donating tons of money to The National Museum of African American History & Culture.

Just sayin’.

And, how exactly do they measure being “successful?”

By the amount of money they manage to bring in, I assume.

It wouldn’t have anything to do with the quality of their exhibits or anything like that.

Marina Watts for Newsweek [sometimes referred to as “Weaknews”] added, “The Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture recently unveiled guidelines for talking about race.”

How nice of you all to assume that responsibility!

And what an invaluable set of guidelines they are!

“A graphic displayed in the guidelines, entitled ‘Aspects and Assumptions of Whiteness in the United States,’ declares that rational thinking and hard work, among others, are white values.”

“In the section, Smithsonian declares that ‘objective, rational, linear thinking,’ ‘quantitative emphasis,’ ‘hard work before play,’ and various other values are aspects and assumptions of whiteness.”

I’m just trying to imagine the collection of racist idiots, sitting in a conference room somewhere inside the esteemed Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, kicking around these “assumptions of whiteness.”

“They referred to the website’s page titled ‘Whiteness’ when asked for additional comment. The graphic was later removed from the page.”

I guess “taking responsibility” isn’t a quality that we should attribute to these representatives of African American culture either.

‘“White dominant culture, or whiteness, refers to the ways white people and their traditions, attitudes, and ways of life have been normalized over time and are now considered standard practices in the United States’ the introduction to the section reads. ‘And since white people still hold most of the institutional power in America, we have all internalized some aspects of white culture— including people of color.’”

“Another section says that white values include ‘steak and potatoes: bland is best’ and that white people have ‘no tolerance for deviation from a ‘single god’ concept.’”

“Other subsections deal with ‘family structure,’ ‘rugged individualism,’ ‘Protestant work ethic’ and ‘aesthetics [Concerned with the nature and appreciation of beauty, especially in art.].’”

“The ‘White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack’ section says that white people do not need to worry about certain things, such as doing things alone without being followed or harassed, along with feeling that their race is properly represented.

‘“Thinking about race is very different for nonwhite persons living in America,’ the Smithsonian site continues. ‘People of color must always consider their racial identity, whatever the situation, due to the systemic and interpersonal racism that still exists.’”

“On July 15, the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture clarified their portal’s intentions and how readers should approach the information. ‘At a time when the soul of our country is being tested, our Talking About Race portal will help individuals and communities foster constructive conversations and much needed dialogue about one of our nation’s most challenging topics: Racism and its corrosive impact,’ the museum began a Twitter thread.”

I’m not sure about helping to “foster constructive conversations,” but I do know you’ve given us an example “racism and it’s corrosive impact.”

‘“America is once again facing the challenge of race, a challenge that needs all of our understanding and commitment,’ it continued. ‘Our portal was designed to help individuals, families, and communities talk about racism, racial identity and how forces shape every aspect of our society.’”

In this regard, The National Museum of African American History & Culture has failed miserably.

Spencer Crew is serving as the Interim Director of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC). He is also the Clarence J. Robinson Professor of American, African American and Public History at George Mason University.

As the Interim Director, he has some level of responsibility here.

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The Museum Council consists of:

 

Kenneth Irvine Chenault

Chair

Chairman and managing director, General Catalyst

 

Anthony Coles

Vice Chair of Advancement Committee

Executive Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Cerevel Therapeutics

 

Franklin D. Raines

Vice Chair of Finance Committee

Former chairman and CEO, Fannie Mae; former director, U.S. Office of Management and Budget

 

Ruth J. Simmons

Vice Chair of Nominating and Governance Committee

President, Prairie View A&M University; President Emerita, Brown University

 

Elizabeth Alexander

President, The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

 

Rosalind Brewer

COO and Group President, Starbucks

 

Lonnie G. Bunch, III

Secretary, Smithsonian Institution

 

Laura W. Bush

Former first lady of the United States of America

 

Maverick Carter

Principal, LRMR Ventures

 

James I. Cash, Jr.

James E. Robison Professor of Business Administration Emeritus, Harvard Business School

 

Kenneth L. Coleman

Chairman, Saama Technologies, Inc.

 

Edith Cooper

Board Director, Etsy, Slack, and EQT Partners

 

Kenneth C. Frazier

President and CEO, Merck & Co.

 

LaTanya R. Jackson

Actress, director, and producer

 

Linda Johnson Rice

Chairman, Johnson Publishing Company, Inc.

 

Robert L. Johnson

Founder and Chairman, The RLJ Companies; founder and former Chairman, Black Entertainment Television, Inc.

 

Quincy D. Jones

Producer and CEO, Quincy Jones Productions, Inc.

 

Ted Leonsis

Founder, Chairman, and CEO of Monumental Sports

 

Doris Matsui (D-CA 6th District)

Member, United States House of Representatives

 

Brian T. Moynihan

Chairman and CEO, Bank of America

 

Charles Edwards Phillips, Jr.

CEO, Infor

 

General Colin L. Powell

Retired General, United States Army; former Secretary of State, United States of America

 

Earl W. Stafford

CEO, The Wentworth Group, LLC

 

Patrick Swygert

President emeritus, Howard University

 

Darren Walker

President, Ford Foundation

 

Anthony Welters

Executive chairman, BlackIvy Group, LLC

 

Oprah Winfrey

Chairman and CEO, OWN: Oprah Winfrey Network and Harpo, Inc.

 

Robert L. Wright

Co-chairman emeritus, SENTEL Corporation

 

Emeritus Members:

Richard Dean Parsons

 

Below are the various curators at the museum:

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Jacquelyn D. Serwer, Chief Curator with the National Museum of African American History and Culture

They all appear very happy, and feeling they’re “all that.”

I would like to know which of these curators are responsible for this display of racist idiocy.

Whoever is responsible should be relieved of their duties at the museum.

The museum should also be issuing a formal apology.

I don’t actually expect either of these things to happen, but I think it is reasonable to expect, nonetheless.

 

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Mo’ Money, Mo’ Money, Mo’ Money!

“[Black Entertainment Television] BET founder Robert Johnson explains his Big Idea of $14 trillion in slavery reparations,” as reported by Maria Schultz of Fox News.

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“Johnson says 40 million African Americans should each receive $350,000 to atone for slavery and to close the wealth gap with white Americans.”

How does Mr. Johnson define “African American?”

If we manage to come up with a “reparations” dollar amount, does this payment get cut in half if you’re only half African?

What if you’re a quarter African…, or an eighth?

What if your 1/1024 African descent, like Senator Elizabeth Warren is 1/1024 Native American?

And how will this be determined and who will determine it?

Just askin’.

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‘“The Big Idea’ is a series that asks top lawmakers and figures to discuss their moonshot — what’s the one proposal, if politics and polls and even price tag were not an issue, they’d implement to change the country for the better?”

“Robert Johnson, the founder of Black Entertainment Television, says it’s time America atones for slavery and systemic racism by paying African-Americans reparations to make them economically equal to white Americans.”

“Johnson, the first black billionaire in the United States, has put a price tag on the debt America owes to African-Americans at $14 trillion.”

Hmmm…, why hasn’t this systematic racism stopped you Mr. Johnson?

There are millions and millions of white, off-white, light brown, yellow and red people walking around who aren’t billionaires like you.

But how can that be if our apparent racism is such a hinderance to you and other African Americans?

‘“Nobody talks about cash, but black people understand cash,’ Johnson told Fox News.”

That’s a good one, Mr. Johnson!  But, I would say everybody pretty much understands the concept of “cash money.” That statement there is a pretty racist statement, itself, from where I’m standing.

“Under his proposal, an estimated 40 million African-Americans would get $350,000 in direct cash payments over 30 years (costing the average taxpayer roughly $2,900 a year, according to his office). The $350,000 would signify the wealth disparity between African-Americans and white Americans.”

Exactly how would non-white people be excluded from chipping in on this tax?

Would African Americans end up paying for their own reparations?

Just askin’.

“Johnson contends white Americans built generations of wealth on the backs of slave labor, and black people will never be able to catch up in wealth unless they are paid this debt.”

“You want a big idea: white America, what would happen if you said, ‘please forgive us and accept our apology. And by the way, we think we owe you what was taken from you for over 300 years of slavery, Jim Crow, segregation and denial of economic opportunity and rights,’ Johnson said.”

‘“I think that would be a huge emotional assuaging of guilt.’”

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Your assumption that I feel any guilt is a major miscalculation on your part.

How about if we [white people] said, “Please forgive us and accept our apology on behalf of our ancestors, and just left it at that?

I mean millions of non-black people immigrated to America after the whole slavery thing even took place.

It is pretty racist for African Americans to expect reparations from people based solely on race rather than actual ancestral ties, isn’t it?

Again, just askin’.

What would probably work better would be a Labor Day telethon type of thing, where those that do feel guilty can “assuage” their guilt by kicking into a pot that would then be distributed as a means of “reparation.”

“Johnson, the founder of RLJ Companies, discussed his reparations proposal at length with Fox News this week. This Q & A has been edited for clarity and brevity:”

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“Q: You’ve put forth a reparations plan that calls for $14 trillion in direct cash payments to descendants from slavery. Why do you think it’s important for today’s Americans to atone for the sins of the past?”

“Johnson: ‘America from its inception has been plagued by the evils of slavery, so much so that this country fought a brutal civil war to try to settle the issue. Well, obviously, the issue was not settled after the Civil War. And this country has experienced continual racial violence, segregation and discrimination since that time. And as a country that has espoused ideas about freedom, individual rights, equal treatment under the law, everything in the Declaration of Independence and Constitution, and yet at the same time have this significant division between blacks and whites. Economically, socially, educationally — all of these things are because America has never come to grips with its original sin of slavery, which has been responsible for most of the disharmony between blacks and whites in this country.

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And therefore, I’m proposing that if America can atone for that in the form of cash payments to African-Americans to make them economically equal to white Americans, two things will happen. One, African-Americans will be, in effect, financially equal in a capitalist society and given the opportunity to grow wealth for themselves and their families. And two … unless you can atone, forgive and then repair in the form of the $14 trillion of cash, which the way I’ve developed it would make 40 million African-Americans equal in wealth to white Americans, we will live with this problem for generations to come.”

“Q: Your plan calls for $14 trillion to be paid out to descendants of slavery over the course of 30 years. How do you get to that figure?”

“Johnson: ‘It’s simple math. If you look at it this way, the median white American family has about $350,000 of personal net worth. African-Americans have about 10 times less than that. So about, let’s say, $30,000 of personal net worth of an African-American family. In order to make everything equal. You have to bring African-Americans equal to white Americans.’”

‘“And the factors that we use to determine net worth are pretty simple. Your home is your most important asset for most middle-class people. African-Americans are way behind white Americans in homeownership. Income, i.e. salaries, are the next factor in wealth. African-Americans fall behind white Americans significantly in income, savings, investments in stocks and bonds, money to put your kids in school. When you take all these factors, you come up with the fact that the disparity of wealth is something that you need to close. So, in order to close that — to bring 40 million African-Americans, up to $350,000 of wealth. Well, you multiply that number — $350,000 – times 40 million African-American descendants of slaves. You come out with $14 trillion. That money would be paid out over 30 years.’”

So, like in your case Mr. Johnson, and the cases of many extravagantly rich black entertainers and sports figures…, would they be expected to return much of their wealth in an effort to “equalize” things?

Again, just askin’.

“Q: Would this be a special reparations new tax that would fund this program?”

“Johnson: ‘Ultimately, it’s a debt owed by the taxpayers. And reparations is a debt owed by the nation as a whole because all of the wealth that was taken from slaves. Free labor is a transfer of wealth.

That wealth of slavery found its way throughout the creation of wealth in the United States. I’ve often said that slaves may have died but the money that they created did not die. Money doesn’t die.’”

You did live through live through the financial crises of 2007-2008 didn’t you, Mr. Johnson?

Money doesn’t seem to “die” for people like you or our privileged and protected financial institutions, but for average people like me, a lot of our money definitely “died,” or was redistributed back to those who caused the problem out of their greed in the first place.

Just sayin’.

‘“Money not only circulates; money multiplies. If you gave me a group of the brightest forensic accountants, I would be willing to bet you that I could trace every dollar of wealth in the United States today back to slavery.’”

Oh, I’m sure you could…, and I’m sure you’d be wrong.

Many, many, many more Americans did not own slaves, as opposed to those who did.

‘“The $350,000 would be paid on average $10,000 to $11,000 per year for the next 30 years to each African-American descendant. Let’s assume there are 170 million people who pay taxes in the U.S. If you break it down by days, it comes out to American taxpayers paying about $8 a day in reparations.’”

Oh, that’s all?

‘“Now, anticipating the question, what about poor whites who may not have that money to pay into the reparations program? Well, we could do it like we do other taxes. It could be a progressive tax. So those white Americans with more money would pay more, like the income tax. Those white Americans with less money would pay less. And by the way, African-Americans would also pay tax on this because it’s a responsibility of the nation. And we’re not exempting African-Americans from paying that tax, even though they are the recipients of the damages, just as if you were to get damages awarded by a court today. The court wouldn’t say, well, you have damages coming, you don’t have to pay taxes. You have to pay taxes.’”

Ok…, well that doesn’t make much sense, reparations or not.

And poor “guilty” people are held to lesser accountability than richer “guilty” people?

This whole thing just keeps getting better and better.

“Q: And how do you envision these direct cash payments being distributed? And how would you determine who is eligible for the payments?”

“Johnson: ‘The eligibility is any African-American, black American, who is a direct descendant of slaves. So that’s fairly simple.”

Actually, it isn’t that simple at all.

I would estimate that there are many “black” Americans who are not descendants of slaves.

Does Ancestry.com have the final determination here, or what?

And what if there is no “documentation” available?

Are we just going to take someone’s word for it?

‘“And the definition of who’s black. We simply use the slave era definition of black. And back in slavery days … if you had one drop of blood in you that was black you were determined to be black. You were treated as black. So, we’ll use that same model.’”

So, you’re saying that approximately 300 million out of our population of 328 million would be receiving reparations?

I mean, who’s to deny someone who “identifies” as black or claims that “One drop” of African heritage?

If we get to this point in the process, please remind me to buy stock in DNA testing companies.

Even if someone supported the concept of reparations for slavery, who could support this proposed solution?

‘“The money would come out of the taxpayers’ pockets. …  So that money would be transferred in the form of a cash payment to every African-American. It’s sort of like Social Security. They send you a check.’”

“Q: There’s been some reparations proposals in Washington. Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., has a bill that would establish a commission to study the impact of slavery and continuing discrimination against African Americans and then make recommendations on reparation proposals. In the House, Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, D-Texas, authored the companion legislation. Do you support these efforts? Have you talked to them about these plans?”

“Johnson: ‘I know about them and I know Sheila Jackson Lee and I know Cory, but no, I have not talked about them. And fundamentally, the reason I haven’t talked about them is because they are going nowhere.

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There is no need to study reparations or slavery. You can go to Google and you could have within an instant, hundreds of thousands of articles, literature, studies, on reparations and slavery. To me, this is rearranging the deck chairs on a racial titanic. It’s not going any place.’”

Ha!  A “racial titanic!”  That’s a new one!

‘“The Democrats will never, ever vote for any reparations involving cash payments to descendants of slaves. They will never do it. And what they will do is what they have always done, which is paternalistic programs managed by bureaucrats to give support — somewhat means-tested support — in the black community. And call it a day. That’s it. I guarantee you that’s what will happen with this study. Because that’s what this government … is comfortable with: giving money to hopefully well-meaning bureaucrats to supervise money going to help black people.

If you’re going to close the wealth gap, there are only two ways to do it. Either you’ve got to stop white people from getting wealthier, which you’re not going to. Or you got to make black people wealthier.

The only way you are going to do it is if you give them cash.  Programs don’t do it.’”

Oh…, sorry about that.  Then maybe we should rethink all of these social programs that just “don’t do it.”

“Q:  How would you know if this program has been successful? Would you gauge it from an economic standpoint where you see the wealth gap lessen or be closed?”

“Johnson: ‘You would obviously gauge it by closing the wealth gap. That’s fairly simple because what happens when you have wealth, you do the things that white Americans have done from the time they first arrived here. They bought homes. They started businesses. They sent their kids off to college. They saved. They invested. And all of a sudden they accumulated wealth. African-Americans were denied that opportunity.’”

I don’t think “denied” is the proper word to use here, as there are many wealthy African Americans in America.  So, these wealthy African Americans were not “denied,” but others were?

What is it?

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‘“The second part is really up to white Americans. Will white Americans say to themselves, ‘we have atoned for an original sin. And not only that, we have made 40 million African-Americans whole for what was done to them through no fault of their own. They were dragged here on ships to be slaves. Not even people. Property. And we took advantage of the labor that they created and used it to build our wealth. Now we’re saying we want to atone.’”

And actually, they weren’t “dragged here,” they were sent here by other Africans…, African slave acquirers and African slave traders.

“If white people see this as a way of saying in a huge way, I apologize. I’m sorry. I can assure you there are no more forgiving people on the face of the Earth than African-American people.’”

If what I see on TV, courtesy of Black Lives Matter, is your definition of “forgiving,” you can keep your forgiveness.

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IF…, and that’s a big IF, we ever get to the point of actually doling out reparations, there may be other factors that need to be considered.

Regarding the Black Lives Matter (BLM) actions, let’s start by deducting the costs of all of the burnt buildings and property from the overall reparations amount.

Then let’s deduct the value of all of the looted merchandise.

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How about the cost of all of the torn down statutes, and the cost to clean-up and repair all of the defaced and vandalized property?

Then there’s the cost for additional law enforcement and military deployment.

And how about the costs for the losses of private businesses?

Then we’ll have to deduct a recipient’s cost to society up to this point by determining how much money have they already received via social programs…, or, how much in “reparations” have they already received.

There are six major U.S. welfare programs. They are the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), Medicaid, Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Programs (SNAP or “food stamps”), Supplemental Security Income (SSI), Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), and housing assistance.

Once all of these other factors are taken into consideration, the actual cost of “reparations” to all of the other Americans, or non-blacks, which include those of European descent, Latino descent, Asian descent, Indian descent, Native American descent, can be determined.

I’m sure we’ll find that many African Americans have already received more than their share.

I could additionally make the case that White America has been attempting to make atonements for enslaving Africans all along.

Like I have already mentioned, we have a wide array of social welfare programs, but we also have an allowance of Black specific colleges and businesses, as well as an acceptance of Affirmative Action for scholarships and job opportunities.

In the end, the truth is, slavery was not unique to the United States; it is a part of almost every nation’s history, from Greek and Roman civilizations to contemporary forms of human trafficking.

I don’t have a personal is with Robert Johnson…, in fact, he and I are in agreement on many issues, and on many levels…, however, as far as reparations are concerned, Mr. Johnson is way off base in my opinion.

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Mr. Johnson decried the ineffectiveness of the democrat party on behalf of African-Americans, and he even said he felt “Dems are taking black voters for granted.”

He has called for BLM to break away from the democrats and form their own party.

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The problem is, Mr. Johnson, this “party” already exists.

It’s called The Communist Party.

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“Cultural appropriation!” Cried the cultural appropriator! 

Just as liberal African-Americans are seemingly immune from being racists, it is only the African-American culture that can be appropriated apparently.

Remember…, conservative African-Americans aren’t welcome in the liberal or “liberal Black” club though.

First, let’s see what cultural appropriation is defined as.

Cultural appropriation, at times also phrased cultural misappropriation, “is the adoption of elements of one culture by members of another culture.”

Your first impression might be, “so what?” or “that’s nice.”

I mean, haven’t we heard it said that, “imitation is the sincerest form of flattery?”

Well, I guess we need to add a caveat to that saying now, which would be, “imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, unless you’re a liberal or a liberal African-American.”

Here are some samples of liberal headlines addressing this “terrible” hijacking of the Black culture:

What is cultural appropriation and why is it offensive? – “The Week” website from the United Kingdom.

Why Cultural Appropriation Is Wrong – The “ThoughtCo” website.

Why cultural appropriation isn’t cool – reachout.com website.

… and,

A Point of View: Understanding the Harmful Impact of Cultural Appropriation – by Luiza Dreasher on the “Inclusion Solution” website who asks, “When Non-Black Minorities Adopt Black Style, Is It Still Appropriation?” …and answers, “The answer is simple: Absolutely.”

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Bianca Lambert for the HuffPost (Huffington Post) website says, “We’ve seen a wealth of celebrities including Miley Cyrus and the Kardashians appropriating Black culture, plus countless fashion designers sending white models down their runways wearing ‘locs,’ braids and baby hairs. But what happens when we start to talk about Black appropriation among other minority communities?”

“Anyone can appropriate Black culture, including non-Black minorities, according to Keisha Brown, an associate professor of history at Tennessee State University.”

You know…, in America, Ms. Lambert and Ms. Brown, if you don’t patent something or copyright something you don’t own whatever that is and you don’t have the right to tell anyone else they can’t use it or copy it.

Just sayin’.

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‘“So many facets of Black culture, both historically and contemporaneously, have become synonymous with mainstream American culture,’ Brown told HuffPost. ‘A related issue at hand is the separation of Black culture from the peoples and history that created it. People embrace the hip or popular elements of Black culture, but not Black Americans.’”

I guess it depends on what you consider “mainstream” American culture now doesn’t it, Ms. Brown?  And that’s a two-way street by the way.

“It’s all too common for designers to walk white models down the runway in cornrows.”

How dare they?!

If you want to start crying about “cultural appropriation…,” then let’s cry about ALL “cultural appropriation.”

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You hardly see any Black actresses or singers with “natural” hair anymore.

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Let’s take a look at their cultural appropriation of “white girl’s hair.”

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‘“Cultural appropriation is an issue because of the history of systematic destruction and exploitation of Black culture,’ Day said [Lindsey Day, the co-founder and editor-in-chief of CRWN Magazine]. ‘America turned free people into “niggers,” and to everyone’s surprise, we created new forms of beautiful expression out of that pain. Those cultural expressions have become America’s greatest cultural exports and engines to build white wealth.’”

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Didn’t anyone ever let you know that “life ain’t fair?”

Well, just so you know, it isn’t.

“Nicole C. Jackson, a psychotherapist who specializes in cultural and systemic oppression among emerging adults, works with many young African-American women who struggle with embracing their beauty and identity.”

‘“We often find ourselves in the role of educating everyone, from our children’s teachers, doctors and co-workers about what it means to be us,’ Jackson said. ‘While our voices are essential to the conversation, it is not our responsibility alone to educate others about their injustice and appropriation.’”

Do you include in “your education” for us, about you, that you all feel that you are the only ones who experience injustice?

Do you include in “your education” for us, about you, that you all feel that you are the only ones who experience cultural appropriation?

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Do you include in “your education” for us, about you, that you all feel that you are the only ones worthy of any consideration?

Do you include in “your education” for us, about you, that you all are some of the ones keeping racism and culturalism alive and well in our society?

Just sayin’.

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“Democrats have brainwashed Black Americans!” – Kanye West (Musician/Rapper)

You got that right, Kanye.

“Poor people have been voting democrat for 50 years…, and they’re still poor.” – Charles Barkley (Retired NBA basketball player and now basketball TV analyst)

You got that right, Charles.

Sam Dorman of Fox News reports that, “Kanye West calls out liberals for ‘bullying’ Trump supporters [and] the media’s liberal agenda.”

I applaud Kanye West for not being afraid to state the obvious and brandish the truth.

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Are Trump supporters not being bullied in many cases?

Does the mainstream media not have a liberal agenda?

Well there you go.

“Rapper Kanye West [also] blasted Democrats on Friday, claiming the party was effectively forcing black Americans to abort their children.”

‘“Democrats had us voting for Democrats with food stamps for years, bro. … Guns in the 80s, taking the fathers out the home, Plan B, lowering our votes, making us abort our children,’ he said during an interview published on Friday.”

“In the same interview, with radio host Big Boy, West said black Americans are ‘brainwashed.’ ‘We’re brainwashed out here, bro. Come on, man. This is a free man talking,’ he said.”

Democrats have obviously taken Black Americans for granted for a very long time.

The unwavering 90%+ support of the democrats by Black Americans is definitely unwarranted.

Again…, like Charles Barkley said, “Poor people have been voting democrat for 50 years…, and they’re still poor.”

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But the hold the democrats have had on Blacks is starting to show a few cracks here and there.

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During the 2016 presidential election, President Trump asked Black Americans, “What do you have to lose by taking a chance on me?”

By my estimation, the only thing they have to lose is their front row seats for when their democrat masters throw their crumbs out to all of the black sheep living on their plantation!

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“His comments echoed those of pro-life activists like Dr. Alveda King, the niece of Martin Luther King, Jr.  In June, King blasted Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., for suggesting that abortion was a civil rights issue.”

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‘“I need for her to understand that abortion is a civil wrong,’ King told ‘Fox & Friends.’ ‘And of course, if you’re pro-life, you can’t be racist because you’re defending life for the most defenseless population on the planet — the little babies in the womb,’ King said at the time.”

“The pro-life movement has long pointed out the disparity between black and white abortion rates in the U.S.”

“The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported in 2018 that for 2015, ‘abortion rates and ratios remained 1.5 and 1.3 times higher for Hispanic compared with non-Hispanic white women and 3.6 and 3.5 times higher for non-Hispanic black compared with non-Hispanic white women.”

“At one point during the interview, West also claimed that it was racist for people to tell him he couldn’t support Trump. ‘The most racist thing a person can tell me is that I’m supposed to choose something based on my race,’ he said.”

Kanye’s absolutely right here.  It’s racist and un-American.

Why are Whites, Hispanics and Asians “allowed” to think for themselves, while Blacks are somehow expected to conform to some predetermined way of thinking or be shunned and labeled Uncle Toms and the like?

“West drew some criticism last year after he openly embraced [President] Trump and was seen sport[ing] a ‘Make America Great Again’ hat.”

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Like Kanye said, “Come on, man. This is a free man talking.”

America is the land of the free, and we’re still allowed to believe what we want, think what we want and say what we want, even though the democrats are making their best effort to change all of that.

The thought police are out there and ready to go on active duty if, God forbid, we put the democrats in a position to let them loose.

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In the Black urban culture, it’s cool to be a fool.

But the fact is, there are a lot of factors in our society that influence many different cultural behaviors.

It’s only human nature to attempt to devalue something that is perceived as a weakness to us.

If we’re not good at sports, we tend to devalue the importance of athletic accomplishments.

If we have a hard time getting good grades in school, we tend to devalue the importance of educational accomplishments.

If we have a hard time fitting into the definition of being successful in our society, then we tend to gravitate towards an oppositional stance to that culture, or a counter-culture.

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Josie Harvey, of The HuffPost website, reports that, during an appearance on ‘Lou Dobbs Tonight,’ conservative commentator Heather Mac Donald blamed ‘Black culture’ for the academic achievement gap, and says race and gender diversity goals are blunting the nation’s ‘competitive edge.’”

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Okay…, Black culture may be responsible for an academic achievement gap…, but what factors are responsible for this “Black culture” to begin with?

In my opinion, the root of the problem is that the Black family structure was attacked by liberal policies which began in the 1960’s, which rewarded fatherless families, thus redefining the societal role of Black males.

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Black fathers, in this urban, socioeconomic environment, were devalued, making them unaccountable and irresponsible.

We also have to consider the downward spiral of educational adeptness as generation after generation suffered incrementally from their own lack of education.

In other words, how can these families be expected to support a student at something they have had no success at themselves?

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Take a moment to consider and compare the support and expectations of the typical urban, Asian-American family to those of a typical urban, African-American family.

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The cultural values here are at different ends of the spectrum…, regarding the acceptance of government dependence, family structure, the importance of education, the ability to support the children, and their visions of a desirable society and goals towards being successful.

The generalizations I refer to here, of course, do not apply to EVERY family of any race or culture…, only a majority of them.

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“’The College Board’ (An American not-for-profit organization, representing over 6,000 leading colleges, schools, and other educational organizations, that was formed as the ‘College Entrance Examination Board’ to expand access to higher education.) announced on Tuesday that it was withdrawing plans to introduce an ‘adversity score’ on test results, a measure intended to address inequality in college admissions for those from varying socioeconomic backgrounds.”

Antonia Blumberg, also of The HuffPost website, reports that, “The College Board said Tuesday it would not move forward with a planned ‘adversity score’ intended to help level the playing field for students of diverse social and economic backgrounds who take the SAT admissions test.”

Is that really the intent of an SAT score?

What good is an SAT score that can’t stand on its own?

I mean, either you answer the questions correctly, or you don’t, right?

The College Board also stated that “The ‘Adversity Score’ reflected the ‘privilege’ of other students.”

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I’m not sure if I would refer to the situation here as the “privilege” of others, but I suppose that’s another way of looking at it, if you’re looking at the situation from a victim’s standpoint.

And I’m not inferring any negative connotation on the term “victim” here.  In many cases, many of these students are victims of their circumstances.

“The company, which administers the admissions exam, said its attempt to address inequality in college admissions through a single score was a mistake.”

‘“The idea of a single score was wrong,’ David Coleman, College Board’s chief executive, told The Associated Press. ‘It was confusing and created the misperception that the indicators are specific to an individual student.’”

I’m not exactly sure what he is trying to say here, but I’m glad he at least acknowledged the whole concept was a bad idea.

‘“An updated [software] tool will include detailed high school and neighborhood information to admissions officers as separate data points so they can fairly evaluate each student,’ The Board said.

“In 2017, white students scored an average of 177 points [11%] higher than Black students and 128 points [8%] higher than Hispanic students, according to the National Center for Education Statistics.”

The highest possible composite score for the redesigned SAT is 1600. The average score is 1000. The “section scores” are the individual scores for the two main sections of the SAT: reading/writing and math.  Each of these sections is scored out of 800, and they are added together to get your overall score.

‘“There are a number of amazing students who may have scored less [on the SAT] but have accomplished more,’ Coleman told The Wall Street Journal in May.’”

Really, Mr. Coleman?

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You mean we just can’t start issuing paychecks based on our SAT scores?

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‘“All of this tinkering with meritocratic admissions in colleges and throughout the economy, frankly, is all driven by one fact, which is the persistent academic achievement gap,’ Heather Mac Donald went on to say during an appearance on ‘Lou Dobbs Tonight.’”

‘“If Black culture or the rest of culture could close that gap, we would be back to a colorblind meritocratic system, but the College Board is trying to give colleges an excuse to continue to give preferences to under-prepared Black students, to catapult them into academic environments for which they are not prepared,’ she added.”

If we REALLY wanted a “colorblind” system, we wouldn’t ask the students what race they are when they take the test.

Just sayin’.

 

NOTE:  If you’re not already “following” me and you liked my blog(s) today, please “click” on the comment icon just to the right of the date at the bottom of this article.  From there you can let me know you “like” my blog, leave a comment or click the “Follow” button which will keep you up to date on all of my latest posts.

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