Is this a joke, or are these people just completely incompetent?

Oh, this is no joke.

What we have here is a combination of “racism fever,” complete incompetence, and sheer stupidity.

Laura Italiano of The New York Post writes, “The Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History & Culture has a little-known but controversial section on ‘whiteness’ that is creating a stir on Twitter.”

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I would say “creating a stir” is an odd choice of words.

Please continue with the rest of the blog, and then think about what these actions and statements cause you to think.

“The museum’s online description of the exhibit was tweeted out on Wednesday by Byron York, chief political correspondent for the Washington Examiner.”

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‘“The National Museum of African American History & Culture wants to make you aware of certain signs of “whiteness:” Individualism, hard work, objectivity, the nuclear family, progress, respect for authority, delayed gratification, and more,’ York tweeted.”

Yes…, much more.

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“In an Examiner opinion piece on Thursday, York pointed out the oddity of so many universally positive attributes being ascribed to ‘whiteness.’”

‘“Most of the attributes listed seem to be a recipe for success for anyone,’ he wrote.”

‘“Certainly, millions of black Americans work hard every day, respect individual effort, plan for the future, are polite to others, and so on.  It seems odd to attribute that to “whiteness,” as opposed to, say, the everyday values of trying to lead a successful life.’”

Saying this is “odd” is quite an understatement.

These black Americans are obviously all “Uncle Toms and Aunt Jemimas,” Mr. York, and would not really be considered “black” by the likes of the NAACP, Al Sharpton, Colin Kaepernick, or even Joe Biden.

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‘“Yet according to the National Museum of African American History & Culture, “whiteness” it is.’”

“The original tweet had been retweeted, and liked, more than 22,000 times by Thursday afternoon.”

Who are these people “liking” this completely racist, bigoted and brainless determinations, be they white, black, or whatever?!

‘“Not gonna lie, they nailed us in the food section: “bland is best,”’ Washington Post data reporter and self-described ‘Born-again Minnesotan’ Christopher Ingraham quipped in response.”

I’m not gonna lie either…, you’re an idiot, Mr. Ingraham.

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When you were “born-again,” were you born without a brain?

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I can’t even begin to comment on the level of assumed stereotypical stupidness and self-importance that it took to make that comment.

Here we have ONE stupid white guy out of 220 MILLION white people, and he presumes to stereotype us all and speak for the entire white population.

All I can say is his level of stupidity is quite impressive.

BUT HE IS NOWHERE, NOWHERE NEAR THE LEVEL OF STUPIDITY DEMONSTRATED BY THESE SMITHSONIAN NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY & CULTURE PEOPLE!!!

Do these people working there have ANY qualifications?

Seriously.

Actually, I’m sure they all have very impressive educational resumes…, but what does that tell you about our institutions of “higher” learning?

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“On Thursday, York noted that the DC museum, one of the most successful in the Smithsonian system (at least with all of the liberal tools), gets $33 million in federal funding (I’m paying for this!) and has been supported by ‘the Lilly Endowment, the Oprah Winfrey Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, American Express, Bank of America, 3M, Boeing, Michael Jordan, Kaiser Permanente, the Rockefeller Foundation, Target, UnitedHealth, Walmart, and many more.’”

You can’t get much more politically correct than donating tons of money to The National Museum of African American History & Culture.

Just sayin’.

And, how exactly do they measure being “successful?”

By the amount of money they manage to bring in, I assume.

It wouldn’t have anything to do with the quality of their exhibits or anything like that.

Marina Watts for Newsweek [sometimes referred to as “Weaknews”] added, “The Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture recently unveiled guidelines for talking about race.”

How nice of you all to assume that responsibility!

And what an invaluable set of guidelines they are!

“A graphic displayed in the guidelines, entitled ‘Aspects and Assumptions of Whiteness in the United States,’ declares that rational thinking and hard work, among others, are white values.”

“In the section, Smithsonian declares that ‘objective, rational, linear thinking,’ ‘quantitative emphasis,’ ‘hard work before play,’ and various other values are aspects and assumptions of whiteness.”

I’m just trying to imagine the collection of racist idiots, sitting in a conference room somewhere inside the esteemed Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, kicking around these “assumptions of whiteness.”

“They referred to the website’s page titled ‘Whiteness’ when asked for additional comment. The graphic was later removed from the page.”

I guess “taking responsibility” isn’t a quality that we should attribute to these representatives of African American culture either.

‘“White dominant culture, or whiteness, refers to the ways white people and their traditions, attitudes, and ways of life have been normalized over time and are now considered standard practices in the United States’ the introduction to the section reads. ‘And since white people still hold most of the institutional power in America, we have all internalized some aspects of white culture— including people of color.’”

“Another section says that white values include ‘steak and potatoes: bland is best’ and that white people have ‘no tolerance for deviation from a ‘single god’ concept.’”

“Other subsections deal with ‘family structure,’ ‘rugged individualism,’ ‘Protestant work ethic’ and ‘aesthetics [Concerned with the nature and appreciation of beauty, especially in art.].’”

“The ‘White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack’ section says that white people do not need to worry about certain things, such as doing things alone without being followed or harassed, along with feeling that their race is properly represented.

‘“Thinking about race is very different for nonwhite persons living in America,’ the Smithsonian site continues. ‘People of color must always consider their racial identity, whatever the situation, due to the systemic and interpersonal racism that still exists.’”

“On July 15, the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture clarified their portal’s intentions and how readers should approach the information. ‘At a time when the soul of our country is being tested, our Talking About Race portal will help individuals and communities foster constructive conversations and much needed dialogue about one of our nation’s most challenging topics: Racism and its corrosive impact,’ the museum began a Twitter thread.”

I’m not sure about helping to “foster constructive conversations,” but I do know you’ve given us an example “racism and it’s corrosive impact.”

‘“America is once again facing the challenge of race, a challenge that needs all of our understanding and commitment,’ it continued. ‘Our portal was designed to help individuals, families, and communities talk about racism, racial identity and how forces shape every aspect of our society.’”

In this regard, The National Museum of African American History & Culture has failed miserably.

Spencer Crew is serving as the Interim Director of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC). He is also the Clarence J. Robinson Professor of American, African American and Public History at George Mason University.

As the Interim Director, he has some level of responsibility here.

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The Museum Council consists of:

 

Kenneth Irvine Chenault

Chair

Chairman and managing director, General Catalyst

 

Anthony Coles

Vice Chair of Advancement Committee

Executive Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Cerevel Therapeutics

 

Franklin D. Raines

Vice Chair of Finance Committee

Former chairman and CEO, Fannie Mae; former director, U.S. Office of Management and Budget

 

Ruth J. Simmons

Vice Chair of Nominating and Governance Committee

President, Prairie View A&M University; President Emerita, Brown University

 

Elizabeth Alexander

President, The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

 

Rosalind Brewer

COO and Group President, Starbucks

 

Lonnie G. Bunch, III

Secretary, Smithsonian Institution

 

Laura W. Bush

Former first lady of the United States of America

 

Maverick Carter

Principal, LRMR Ventures

 

James I. Cash, Jr.

James E. Robison Professor of Business Administration Emeritus, Harvard Business School

 

Kenneth L. Coleman

Chairman, Saama Technologies, Inc.

 

Edith Cooper

Board Director, Etsy, Slack, and EQT Partners

 

Kenneth C. Frazier

President and CEO, Merck & Co.

 

LaTanya R. Jackson

Actress, director, and producer

 

Linda Johnson Rice

Chairman, Johnson Publishing Company, Inc.

 

Robert L. Johnson

Founder and Chairman, The RLJ Companies; founder and former Chairman, Black Entertainment Television, Inc.

 

Quincy D. Jones

Producer and CEO, Quincy Jones Productions, Inc.

 

Ted Leonsis

Founder, Chairman, and CEO of Monumental Sports

 

Doris Matsui (D-CA 6th District)

Member, United States House of Representatives

 

Brian T. Moynihan

Chairman and CEO, Bank of America

 

Charles Edwards Phillips, Jr.

CEO, Infor

 

General Colin L. Powell

Retired General, United States Army; former Secretary of State, United States of America

 

Earl W. Stafford

CEO, The Wentworth Group, LLC

 

Patrick Swygert

President emeritus, Howard University

 

Darren Walker

President, Ford Foundation

 

Anthony Welters

Executive chairman, BlackIvy Group, LLC

 

Oprah Winfrey

Chairman and CEO, OWN: Oprah Winfrey Network and Harpo, Inc.

 

Robert L. Wright

Co-chairman emeritus, SENTEL Corporation

 

Emeritus Members:

Richard Dean Parsons

 

Below are the various curators at the museum:

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Jacquelyn D. Serwer, Chief Curator with the National Museum of African American History and Culture

They all appear very happy, and feeling they’re “all that.”

I would like to know which of these curators are responsible for this display of racist idiocy.

Whoever is responsible should be relieved of their duties at the museum.

The museum should also be issuing a formal apology.

I don’t actually expect either of these things to happen, but I think it is reasonable to expect, nonetheless.

 

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“Cultural appropriation!” Cried the cultural appropriator! 

Just as liberal African-Americans are seemingly immune from being racists, it is only the African-American culture that can be appropriated apparently.

Remember…, conservative African-Americans aren’t welcome in the liberal or “liberal Black” club though.

First, let’s see what cultural appropriation is defined as.

Cultural appropriation, at times also phrased cultural misappropriation, “is the adoption of elements of one culture by members of another culture.”

Your first impression might be, “so what?” or “that’s nice.”

I mean, haven’t we heard it said that, “imitation is the sincerest form of flattery?”

Well, I guess we need to add a caveat to that saying now, which would be, “imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, unless you’re a liberal or a liberal African-American.”

Here are some samples of liberal headlines addressing this “terrible” hijacking of the Black culture:

What is cultural appropriation and why is it offensive? – “The Week” website from the United Kingdom.

Why Cultural Appropriation Is Wrong – The “ThoughtCo” website.

Why cultural appropriation isn’t cool – reachout.com website.

… and,

A Point of View: Understanding the Harmful Impact of Cultural Appropriation – by Luiza Dreasher on the “Inclusion Solution” website who asks, “When Non-Black Minorities Adopt Black Style, Is It Still Appropriation?” …and answers, “The answer is simple: Absolutely.”

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Bianca Lambert for the HuffPost (Huffington Post) website says, “We’ve seen a wealth of celebrities including Miley Cyrus and the Kardashians appropriating Black culture, plus countless fashion designers sending white models down their runways wearing ‘locs,’ braids and baby hairs. But what happens when we start to talk about Black appropriation among other minority communities?”

“Anyone can appropriate Black culture, including non-Black minorities, according to Keisha Brown, an associate professor of history at Tennessee State University.”

You know…, in America, Ms. Lambert and Ms. Brown, if you don’t patent something or copyright something you don’t own whatever that is and you don’t have the right to tell anyone else they can’t use it or copy it.

Just sayin’.

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‘“So many facets of Black culture, both historically and contemporaneously, have become synonymous with mainstream American culture,’ Brown told HuffPost. ‘A related issue at hand is the separation of Black culture from the peoples and history that created it. People embrace the hip or popular elements of Black culture, but not Black Americans.’”

I guess it depends on what you consider “mainstream” American culture now doesn’t it, Ms. Brown?  And that’s a two-way street by the way.

“It’s all too common for designers to walk white models down the runway in cornrows.”

How dare they?!

If you want to start crying about “cultural appropriation…,” then let’s cry about ALL “cultural appropriation.”

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You hardly see any Black actresses or singers with “natural” hair anymore.

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Let’s take a look at their cultural appropriation of “white girl’s hair.”

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‘“Cultural appropriation is an issue because of the history of systematic destruction and exploitation of Black culture,’ Day said [Lindsey Day, the co-founder and editor-in-chief of CRWN Magazine]. ‘America turned free people into “niggers,” and to everyone’s surprise, we created new forms of beautiful expression out of that pain. Those cultural expressions have become America’s greatest cultural exports and engines to build white wealth.’”

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Didn’t anyone ever let you know that “life ain’t fair?”

Well, just so you know, it isn’t.

“Nicole C. Jackson, a psychotherapist who specializes in cultural and systemic oppression among emerging adults, works with many young African-American women who struggle with embracing their beauty and identity.”

‘“We often find ourselves in the role of educating everyone, from our children’s teachers, doctors and co-workers about what it means to be us,’ Jackson said. ‘While our voices are essential to the conversation, it is not our responsibility alone to educate others about their injustice and appropriation.’”

Do you include in “your education” for us, about you, that you all feel that you are the only ones who experience injustice?

Do you include in “your education” for us, about you, that you all feel that you are the only ones who experience cultural appropriation?

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Do you include in “your education” for us, about you, that you all feel that you are the only ones worthy of any consideration?

Do you include in “your education” for us, about you, that you all are some of the ones keeping racism and culturalism alive and well in our society?

Just sayin’.

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