“Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction.” – Ronald Reagan

It seems that a lot of issues in the news are defined generationally these days.  But I’m not sure we’re always really clear about the generations they’re referring to…, other than our own generation that is!

See if the descriptor for your generation seems to fit or not.

Here’s a look at America’s generations…, who we were and who we are.

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The Greatest Generation

Born 1901-1927

92 years old+

Approximately 2 million

Tom Brokaw’s 1998 book declared the generation that persevered through America’s Great Depression and fought in World War II America’s “Greatest Generation.”  These people believe in personal responsibility, humility, dignity and modesty. The society of their time held itself to a higher standard.  They had a hard work ethic and took great pride in their work as well. “The Greatest Generation” saved everything and are considered very frugal.

For reference sake, the generation before “The Greatest Generation” was named “The Lost Generation.”  They are truly lost.  No one is believed to still be alive who were born in 1900 or before.  The members of the Lost Generation saw the transition from the horse to the automobile.  The Wright Brothers took the first airplane flight. As this generation was coming of age, millions of immigrants poured into the United States, searching for a better life. World War I had a tremendous influence on this generation. It lasted many years, and by the time it had ended, millions of men had been affected by the horrors of battle, and then there was The Great Depression.  This generation developed a real skepticism where the government was concerned.

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The Silent Generation

Born 1928-1945

74 to 91 years old

Approximately 24 million

We don’t hear a lot about this generation, so I guess it’s aptly named. It’s known as the “silent generation” because children of this era were expected to be seen and not heard. Most of them are retired now, but they were hardworking. The silent generation brought the strong work ethic of their parents into the factories of industrialized society. They grew up during lean times, including the Great Depression and World War II. They consider work a privilege, and it shows.  They’re considered the wealthiest generation.  They believe you earn your own way through hard work and they think others should do the same.

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Baby Boomers

Born 1946-1964

55 to 73 years old

Approximately 74 million

“Boomers” also place a high value on their work ethic, and derive most of their self-worth from their work ethic. They live to work.  They are competitive and goal oriented. They want to “make a difference” in the world.

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Generation Xer’s

Born 1965-1981

38 to 54 years old

Approximately 66 million

As opposed to “Boomers,” “Xer’s” work to live.  They value their independence and are driven by results.  They tend to think more globally, adapt well to change, and are eager to learn. They place a high value on education and believe it is needed to succeed.

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Generation Y (Millennials)

Born 1982-1994

25 to 37 years old

Approximately 71 million

Millennials tend to be very transparent and share everything.  They also desire to make an impact somehow.  They are very conscious of fairness and right and wrong, and believe business should be handled ethically this way.  They value diversity and the love technology.  Millennials don’t perform at their best in a traditional work environment.  Technology is at the heart of their problem solving and solutions.

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Generation Z (Centennials)

Born 1995-now

1 to 24 years old

Approximately 90 million

The first generation to grow up entirely with modern technology.  It is all second hand to them.  They are accepting of others and socially transparent, yet individualistic and competitive.  They like to “make things,” and they are entrepreneurial and have an inventive spirit. They consider themselves realists.

In 10 years or so, Generation Z, or “The Centennials” will be controlling the direction of the country.

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Although, according to “The Centennials,” the world is supposed to end by this time due to climate change…, so we may have that going for us!

Either that, or we’ll be hearing more excuses and explanations from these “scientists” as to why we’re still here.

I’m willing to bet on the latter.

Ha!

The more things change the more they stay the same.

There are more current generational issues that may affect us, however.

Julia Limitone of FOXBusiness askes, “Boomer homes to flood US market, but who will buy them?”

Obviously Generation X, Y and Zer’s.

“The U.S. housing market is on the verge of being inundated with homes for sale on a scale that hasn’t been seen since the housing bubble in the mid-2000s.”

“The tsunami [of homes] is being driven by a grim reality: Baby Boomers dying [and downsizing].”

“Four out of 10 U.S. homes are owned by residents age 60 or older, and five out of 10 by residents 55 or older, according to Zillow. Over the next two decades, more than a quarter, or roughly 21 million homes, are likely to be vacated. During the last housing bubble there were only 450,000 new home sales per year, on average.”

So, we’re talking roughly twice as many home becoming available over a given period of time.

The last “housing bubble” included a different set of circumstances, however.  The last “housing bubble” was caused by speculative and risky real estate investment of properties other than peoples’ primary homes.  Here we won’t have people going bankrupt…, we’ll just have people making less of a profit than they were anticipating, and Generation X, Y and Zer’s getting some nice deals on these properties.

It will be far from a “housing market collapse,” or anything of that nature.

Plus people will start to anticipate the potential of these situations to affect their investments, and adjustments will be made gradually over the next 20 years.

The “journalistic know-it-alls” love to sound alarms, in this case about the economy and the real estate market, while most of them are still living and working out of their parent’s home, or sharing an apartment with two other “know-it-alls!”

 

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“A picture is worth a thousand words.” In these cases…, maybe more.

Here are some of the famous pictures that reflect our American history and reflect events that have changed our history.

aoc history

… although this picture is not one of those pictures!

Let’s continue…

nine eleven

09/11/2001.  Some pictures don’t need any description.

The assassination of John F. Kennedy, the ensuing investigation, and all of the questions surrounding the assassination, have remained for over 50 years.

1963 – President John F. Kennedy and his wife Jacqueline in Dallas, Texas, moments before he was fatally shot.

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President Kennedy is hit.

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A frantic Jackie scrambles onto the back of the car.

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The murder of Lee Harvey Oswald, the alleged assassin of The President, by Jack Ruby, in the Dallas jail.

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In 1986 The Space Shuttle Challenger exploded shortly after lift-off, shocking our nation and the world.

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challenger

Neil Armstrong takes the first step onto the moon’s surface, July 20, 1969.  He and Buzz Aldrin were the first humans to land on the moon.  A smart phone, like most of us have, has thousands of times the computing power of the computers on Apollo 11.

“That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.” – Neil Armstrong, as he stepped onto the surface of the moon.

moon landing

This picture, taken in New York City, known as “The Kiss,” represents the unbridled joy by all Americans that World War II had finally come to an end.

the kiss

On August 14, 1945, President Harry Truman announced from the White House that the Japanese were unconditionally surrendering.  As soon as the news was announced, spontaneous celebrations erupted across the United States.

But as memorable as the arrival of victory over Japan was, the day was bittersweet for the many Americans whose loved ones would not be returning home.  More than 400,000 Americans had given their lives in World War II, and America would never be the same.

In 2016, Donald Trump shocked the entire country by pulling off the upset of the century, while not only winning the presidency, but doing so convincingly.  The “forgotten men and women” in our country rose up and made their votes count.  Politics and the way we view “the media” in our country would never be the same.

trump elected

trump wins landslide

I hope you enjoyed this trip through some of our history as Americans, as seen through the camera lens.

Please let me know if you agree with the events I’ve chosen, if you feel I missed any, or if you you’d just like to reminisce or leave a comment.

 

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“Gobble, Gobble, Gobble?” What’s the true story of “Thanksgiving?”

The “Thanksgiving” that The Pilgrims celebrated back in 1621 (almost 400 years ago) may not have been exactly what many of us believe it was, but it was probably pretty close.  Let’s take a look.

The Pilgrims’ first year in this new land had been a very difficult one to say the least, and the ones who were still there were just truly thankful to be alive.  They were also very thankful to the Native American people who helped them to survive in this new land, and of course they were thankful to God as well.

Almost a year earlier the first landing party had arrived at the site of what later became the settlement of Plymouth.  During that first winter, the Mayflower colonists suffered greatly.  45 out of 102 immigrants died that winter.  The following March, the first formal contact occurred with the Indians (or Native Americans).

(Note: All the way back to 1492, and the days of Christopher Columbus, the Native Americans here were referred to as “Indians” because Columbus believed he had landed in India, which was his real target destination at the time.)

Both sides managed to establish a formal treaty of peace. This treaty ensured that each people would not bring harm to the other, and that they would come to each other’s aid in a time of war.

By November 1621, only 53 pilgrims were alive to celebrate the harvest feast which modern Americans now know as “The First Thanksgiving.” Of the original 18 adult women, 13 died the first winter while another died in May. Only four adult women were left alive for the first Thanksgiving.

This first “Thanksgiving” was really a celebration of survival, a show of goodwill and a way for the settlers to show their appreciation to their Native American neighbors, by sharing a feast with them after their harvest, and before the onset of another winter.

When we think about “Thanksgiving,” it’s all about the food!  Turkey, gravy, potatoes, sweet potatoes, corn, stuffing, cranberry sauce, hot rolls, and pumpkin pie are what most of us would feel is required of a real “Thanksgiving” dinner.  Different families may have certain additional items that have been added to the tradition as well.  But what did the Pilgrims and their guests have to eat at that first “Thanksgiving?”

Well, the Pilgrims and their guests didn’t have corn, apples, potatoes or even cranberries. No one knows for sure if they even had turkey, although they did eat turkey from time to time.  Ducks or geese would have been more plentiful this time of year.  The only food we know they had for sure was deer (venison).

The feast between The Pilgrims and the Native American Wampanoag people probably also contained fish, lobster, eels, clams, turnips, berries, pumpkin, and squash.

You didn’t hear any moms or dads yelling at the kids to use their fork either.  Forks weren’t even invented yet!

So where did we get the idea from that you have to have turkey and cranberry sauce and such on Thanksgiving?  It was because the people of the Victorian Era prepared Thanksgiving that way.

thanksgiving dinner

The Victorian era of history was the period of Queen Victoria’s reign over Britain from 1837 until she died in January of 1901. It was a long period of peace, prosperity, and refined social behavior.  Thanksgiving became a national holiday, beginning in 1863, when Abraham Lincoln issued his presidential Thanksgiving proclamations.  There were actually two of them, one to celebrate Thanksgiving in August, and a second one in November.  Before Lincoln, Americans outside New England did not usually celebrate the holiday.

So there you have it, and remember to say “please” before you ask someone to “pass the eels” this Thanksgiving!

I hope you and your family have a wonderful Thanksgiving!

 

Note: Thank you to Rick Shenkman, of the History News Network, for contributing to this article.

 

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thanksgiving

 

 

The Mystery of the “Genetic Disc.”

This is one of the most mysterious artifacts in the world!

It was discovered in Colombia.  It is 10 ½ inches in diameter, and weighs about 4 ½ pounds.

Both sides are covered in illustrations of the development of a fetus in all stages.  Nowadays, most of this process is only observed by doctors using special equipment.

So how was this knowledge known 6,000 years ago?

And what other knowledge could have been possessed by the obscure civilization which made the disc?

Colombian professor, Jeime Gutierrez Lega, has been gathering unexplained ancient objects for years.  Most of the artifacts from his collection have been discovered in explorations of the almost inaccessible region of the province of Cundinamarca, Columbia.  They are stones with illustrations of people and animals and baffling symbols and inscriptions in an unknown language.

The main exhibit of the professor’s collection is the Genetic disc (also known as the embryonic disc), made from lydite, a stone, first mined in Lydia, an ancient country in the western part of Malaysia (south of Cambodia, Vietnam and Thailand), which is on the other side of the world, in the Indian Ocean.

The stone is similar to granite in the matter of hardness, but it also possesses a layered structure along with the hardness, which makes it very difficult to work with.

The stone is also known as darlingite, radiolarite, and basanite.  Since ancient times, it has been used for the manufacturing of jewels and mosaics.  But cutting something from it should have been impossible using the tools possessed by humans 6,000 years ago.

The problem comes from its layered structure, because it will automatically break upon contact with cutting tools. And still, the genetic disc is made from this mineral, and the drawings on it more closely resemble a print rather than a carving.

It is obvious that when the mineral underwent its treatment, a technique unknown to us was used.  Its secret remains a mystery to this day.

The illustrations on the disc are also a source of many questions. The entire process of the beginning of human life is illustrated on the circumference of both sides with incredible accuracy, the purpose of male and female reproductive organs, the moment of conception, development of the fetus inside the womb and the birth of the baby.

On the left part of the disc (if we are to imagine the circle as a dial on a watch, the location of 11 o’clock) a clear drawing of sperm with no spermatozoids and next to it, one with spermatozoids (the author probably wanted to illustrate the birth of the male seed).

For the record, spermatozoids weren’t discovered until 1677 by Antonie van Leeuwenhoek and his student.  This event was preceded by the invention of the microscope back in 1590, but the illustrations on the disc prove that there was presence of such knowledge thousands of years earlier.

At the position of 1 o’clock on the disk, one can see several completely formed spermatozoids.  Next to it is a baffling drawing, scientists still haven’t come to a conclusion as to what it means.  Around the position of 3 o’clock there are images of a man, woman, and child.

A fetus in several stages of development, which end in the formation of a baby, is illustrated on the upper part of the opposite side of the disc. The drawing shows the evolution of life inside the mother.  And in the region of 6 o’clock, a man and woman are illustrated once again.

A study determined that these really are illustrations of the basic stages of development of a human fetus, and they can easily be identified.

Researchers have determined the age of the disk to be at least 6,000 years old and it does not belong to any of the existing Colombian cultures of South America.

For now, no one can explain what kinds of technologies were used in the production of this object.

From all the studies and discoveries we can only make the conclusion that it belongs to an unknown and highly developed civilization of the past.

Believe it or not!

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genetic disc

 

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