Donald Trump is exactly the kind of person George Washington and the founding fathers envisioned as a President.

Yes…, Donald Trump is exactly the kind of person George Washington and the founding fathers envisioned as a President or as a member of Congress. 

The founding fathers envisioned successful and accomplished people sacrificing their time, and serving a term or two in government for the good of their country, before returning back to private life and letting another citizen step forward for the good of the country.

The founding fathers envisioned people who had gained some sort of expertise, knowledge, and wisdom in their private ventures, and then putting their experience and talent to work for our country. 

The founding fathers did not envision lifelong politicians who would bring nothing to the table other than their ability to get elected somehow.

The founding fathers did not envision individuals staying 20 years, 30 years, 40 years, or even longer in office, and leaving politics significantly richer than when they came.

Like George Washington, Donald Trump was not a politician.  Like George Washington, he was a reluctant servant, who left a comfortable life to do what felt needed to be done for the American people and the country.

Our founding fathers, truly, were wise men.

They established a form of government never before seen in this world.

A government of the people, by the people, for the people.

From the Declaration of Independence:

“We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.–That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, –That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness.”

Nothing like this had ever been established before.

These founding fathers were undoubtedly great men.

Although I have said that being a great man, sometimes, only requires you to speak the truth and live up to the truth…, like the founding fathers, Abraham Lincoln, and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Here are some quotes from our founding fathers I feel are especially notable”  

“I have lived, Sir, a long time, and the longer I live, the more convincing proofs I see of this truth – that god governs in the affairs of men. And if a sparrow cannot fall to the ground without his notice, is it probable that an empire can rise without his aid?” – Benjamin Franklin

“To argue with a person who has renounced the use of reason is like administering medicine to the dead.” – Thomas Paine

“Government is instituted for the common good; for the protection, safety, prosperity, and happiness of the people; and not for profit, honor, or private interest of any one man, family, or class of men; therefore, the people alone have an incontestable, unalienable, and indefeasible right to institute government; and to reform, alter, or totally change the same, when their protection, safety, prosperity, and happiness require it.” – John Adams

“A fondness for power is implanted, in most men, and it is natural to abuse it, when acquired.” – Thomas Jefferson

“However [political parties] may now and then answer popular ends, they are likely in the course of time and things, to become potent engines, by which cunning, ambitious, and unprincipled men will be enabled to subvert the power of the people and to usurp for themselves the reins of government, destroying afterwards the very engines which have lifted them to unjust dominion….The alternate domination of one faction over another, sharpened by the spirit of revenge, natural to party dissension, which in different ages and countries has perpetrated the most horrid enormities, is itself a frightful despotism.” – George Washington

“When the people fear their government, there is tyranny; when the government fears the people, there is liberty.” – Thomas Jefferson

“Experience hath shown, that even under the best forms of government those entrusted with power have, in time, and by slow operations, perverted it into tyranny.” – Thomas Jefferson

“If freedom of speech is taken away, then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter.” –  George Washington

“Guard against the impostures of pretended patriotism.” – George Washington

Thomas R. Pickering and James Stoutenberg of The New York Times notes that, “In September 1796, George Washington, weary of partisan combat just eight years after the ratification of the Constitution and the founding of the nation, wrote a farewell address explaining why he would not seek a third term. His message is worth remembering in our current political moment.”

“In elaborate and thoughtful prose, Washington raised red flags about disunity, false patriotism, special interests, extreme partisanship, fake news, the national debt, foreign alliances and foreign hatreds. With uncanny foresight, he warned that the most serious threat to our democracy might come from disunity within the country rather than interference from outside. And he foresaw the possibility of foreign influence over our political system and the rise of a president whose ego and avarice would transcend the national interest, raising the threat of despotism.”

“Washington certainly had great confidence, but in his address he didn’t brag about his accomplishments. On the contrary, he beseeched the Almighty to soften the impact of his errors and expressed hopes that the country would forgive them.”

“He cautioned against both overly friendly alliances (lest another country’s interests and wars become our own) and excessive hatreds (lest we provoke unnecessary conflict and war with others).”

“Some of Washington’s most prescient warnings were about the dangers of factionalism. He wrote that should one group, ‘sharpened by the spirit of revenge,’ gain domination over another, the result could be ‘a more formal and permanent despotism.’ The despot’s rise would be fueled by ‘disorders and miseries’ that would gradually push citizens ‘to seek security and repose in the absolute power of an individual.’”

“As if envisioning the political tribalism and 24/7 cable news culture of today, he urged political leaders to restrain ‘the continual mischiefs’ of political parties. The ‘spirit of party,’ he wrote, ‘serves always to distract the public councils and enfeeble the public administration. It agitates the community with ill-founded jealousies and false alarms, kindles the animosity of one part against another, foments occasionally riot and insurrection.’”

“And then he arrived at one of his greatest concerns: The ways in which hyperpartisanship could open the door ‘to foreign influence and corruption, which find a facilitated access to the government itself through the channels of party passions. Thus, the policy and the will of one country are subjected to the policy and will of another.’”

“Since 1893, a senator has read the farewell address on the floor of the Senate every year on Washington’s Birthday, alternating annually by political party. Bluntly speaking, it’s become little more than an exercise in bipartisan lip service. The House of Representatives stopped reading it decades ago. This was, at least, a form of honesty. Clearly no one was listening anymore.”

“Washington’s goal was to ensure that the young country became stable enough to withstand the threats to liberty and freedom he saw on the horizon — a horizon that has now stretched 220 years into the future. We can never say he didn’t warn us.”

President Washington was definitely uncanny in his predictions for the future.

The funny thing about this article is that The New York Times tries sell us that the republicans and President Trump are the problems Washington was talking about in his farewell address and not the democrats and themselves!

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OBAMAGATE! 

Regarding the reporting of Obamagate, Jonathan Tobin’s heart is in the right place, but his understanding has a long way to go to catch up.

Jonathan Tobin, wrote in The New York Post, “For reporting Obamagate straight, media knives are out for Catherine Herridge.”

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“Journalists are pack animals, he continues.”

I would say that’s being extremely kind.

Jackasses are considered pack animals, aren’t they?

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He continues, “That’s especially true in Washington. Despite the hunger for scoops, when it comes to the substance of stories, few have the guts to go against the ideological groupthink that prevails in our nation’s capital.”

Hunger for scoops?

Are you serious?

Their hunger for “scoops” exists only as long as these “scoops” pertain to negative news about President Trump, his administration, republicans in Congress, and republicans and conservatives in general.

And you think what we’re dealing with here is “groupthink,” huh?

I’m sorry, Mr. Tobin…, this isn’t groupthink, it’s called toeing the party line…, promoting the approved narrative…, pushing the desired propaganda, or performing propaganda by omission.

“That’s what makes CBS’ Catherine Herridge so exceptional,” Tobin goes on to say.

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So, a journalist doing what a journalist should be doing makes them exceptional these days?

I guess it does, actually.

“In an era when too many network journalists slant their reporting to serve establishment opinion, Herridge sticks to the facts. Her dogged determination to get to the bottom of stories has made her an invaluable source on the national-security beat.”

If I didn’t know any better, Mr. Tobin, I’d say you have a little thing for Catherine Herridge! Why else would you throw yourself to the liberal wolves to sing Catherine Herridge’s praises?

And, “when too many network journalists slant their reporting?”

Is that what your calling all of this conspiratorial, fraudulent “reporting,” Mr. Tobin…, being “slanted?”

“Her sterling quality and integrity have also put a target on her back. When it came to the ‘collusion hoax,’ she dared to let the truth guide her. Likewise, with her reporting into government misconduct in the prosecution of President Trump’s first national security adviser, Michael Flynn.”

“Most of her colleagues reveled in collusion falsehoods — and ignored FBI wrongdoing. She did the opposite.”

They did more than revel in the “collusion falsehoods,” they knowingly perpetuated these “falsehoods” (LIES) on the American people for well over two years!

TWO YEARS!

Day after day…, night after night.

“But there’s always a price to be paid for refusing to conform. If you expose documents that further discredit the already-exploded myth that Trump colluded with Russia, you are going to lose friends in Washington.”

So, exposing the truth will cause you to “lose friends” amongst the Washington media.

That alone is quite telling.

“If you show that there was a concerted attempt to spy on his campaign and to leak information designed to paralyze his administration, you aren’t going to be popular with journalists who were part of this effort.”

So, she’s not going to be popular with “journalists” who got the story entirely wrong…, knew they got the story entirely wrong…, earned “journalism” awards for their excellence in reporting a story that was entirely false, but pushed it anyway because their ultimate goal was to discredit President Trump and somehow remove him from office?

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Hopefully Catherine Herridge is okay with that.  I always liked her, and I also felt she was one of the few who had a degree of integrity left.

“So, it’s hardly surprising that Herridge — a star reporter at Fox News from 1996 until last year before moving to CBS — has been subjected to abuse by Joe Biden’s campaign mouthpiece and backstabbed by her colleagues in recent days.”

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Her big mistake was allowing herself to be lured to CBS, just like Megyn Kelly was lured to NBC.

You know the old saying, “Keep your friends close, but keep your enemies closer?”

Megyn Kelly was eventually silenced at NBC, and I expect Catherine Herridge will be silenced as well at CBS in the not too distant future.

Eating their contracts is a small price to pay in the grand scheme of things.

And don’t be fooled…, THE LIBERAL NARRATIVE IS ONE, BIG, GRAND SCHEME.

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What would the world be like without The United States of America?

Imagine if you will, a world without The United States of America.

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The world would definitely be quite different today without The United States of America.

Who knows how Britain, France, Spain, and then Mexico would have carved up North America.

Would Hitler have ever been stopped?

Would the Jewish people have been completely exterminated?

Would anyone have gotten in the way of Soviet Union, spreading communism around the world?

Would Christianity have been squashed?

It’s definitely very interesting to ponder what our world would be like if The United States had never come into existence.

And there would not have been a United States, as we have come to know it, without one man.

George Washington.

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As President’s Day and George Washington’s Birthday approaches, I would like to give George Washington his due.

George Washington has been called “the father of our nation.”

That is definitely true…, but he was much, much, much, more.

George Washington was an AMAZING man.

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He deserves our attention and our admiration, without a doubt.

George Washington had a strong moral character and he was considered a person of impeccable character.

“He is polite with dignity, affable without formality, distant without haughtiness, grave without austerity; modest, wise and good,” observed Abigail Adams, the wife of Washington’s vice president, John Adams.

Washington’s lofty reputation was upheld by his actions. He refused to be paid for commanding the Continental Army, only requesting to be reimbursed for expenses, and he resigned his military commission after his popularity surged at the close of The Revolution, putting his allegiance to the republic ahead of a desire for personal gain.

Washington was impressive in stature and in presence, as well.

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As befitting a military hero, and make no mistake he was a hero in every sense of the word, Washington cut a formidable presence. A contemporary in the 1750s described him as “measuring six feet two inches in his stockings and weighing 175 pounds.  His frame is padded with well-developed muscles, indicating great strength.” The admirer also praised Washington’s “commanding countenance,” as well as his “graceful” and “majestic” movements.

By the time he became president, the 57-year-old Washington was certainly less agile but even more imposing at upwards of 200 pounds.

Let’s take a closer look at George Washington.

George Washington was born at his father’s plantation on Popes Creek in Westmoreland County, Virginia, on February 22, 1732.

To put this into perspective, The Mayflower first arrived with the Pilgrims in 1620…, so George Washington was born about a hundred years or so after that.

His father’s name was Augustine and he ran a very successful plantation in the area.

George’s mother was his father’s second wife.  Her name was Mary.

George had two older half-brothers, three younger brothers and two younger sisters.

Growing up, George Washington’s family owned a lot of property, but they were still not considered “rich” for the times.

When George was eleven years old, his father died, leaving most of his property to George’s older half-brothers. The income from what remained was just enough to maintain Mary Washington and her children. As the oldest child remaining at home, George undoubtedly helped his mother manage the Rappahannock River plantation where they lived. There he learned the importance of working hard and working smart.

Unlike many of his contemporaries, George never attended college or received a formal education. To augment his studies, George taught himself through reading and experimentation.

Sounds a lot like Abraham Lincoln, doesn’t it?

Arguably, the two most important men in American history never even went to school, much less college.

Again…, amazing.

Before the age of sixteen, George Washington copied out the 110 rules covered in “The Rules of Civility and Decent Behavior.” This exercise, now regarded as a formative influence in the development of his character, included guidelines for behavior and general courtesies.

Eager for adventure, George wanted to join the British Navy, but his mother refused to let him. Instead, he accompanied a man named Fairfax as a surveyor to the unexplored wilderness of the Virginia frontier.

Had George been allowed to join the British Navy, there probably would not have been a United States of America. Thank you for that Mrs. Washington, and it’s a good thing George listened to his mother!

At seventeen years of age and largely through the Fairfax influence that he had cultivated, George secured an appointment as county surveyor for the newly created Virginia frontier county of Culpeper.

In the fall of 1753, the Governor of Virginia, Robert Dinwiddie sent 21-year-old Major George Washington to deliver a message to the French, who were creeping South and encroaching on Virginia’s territory, demanding they leave the area. With the help of a frontier guide and local Indians, Washington reached the French fort, Le Boeuf, with Dinwiddie’s message. The return trip tested Washington’s endurance. He hiked for days through snowy woods, fell off a raft into the ice-choked Allegheny River, nearly drowned, and was forced to spend a freezing night on an island without shelter. His guide, an experienced backwoodsman, suffered frostbite; but Washington suffered no ill effects. Washington’s account of the arduous 900-mile journey was published by Governor Dinwiddie in both Williamsburg and London, establishing an international reputation for George Washington by the time he was 22.

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Washington was next given command of Virginia’s entire military force. With a few hundred men he was ordered to protect a frontier some 350 miles long. Although this was a frustrating assignment, it provided him with experience in commanding troops through an arduous campaign. In 1758 the British finally took the forks of the Ohio. Peace returned to Virginia, and Washington resigned his commission to return to Mount Vernon, his duty faithfully performed.

On January 6th, 1759, Washington married Martha Dandridge Custis, a charming and vivacious young woman.

Martha Washington joined her husband in his winter quarters every year of the war. Together they entertained his officers and guests. A patriot in her own right, Mrs. Washington made it her war too, nursing sick and wounded soldiers and raising money for the troops.

The first time George Washington ran for public office, he lost.

Who’d he lose to would be my question?!  That must have been one hell of a guy!

However, he won his second race and served in the Virginia House of Burgesses (Representatives) from 1758 until 1776.

George Washington spent the years between 1759 and 1775 farming at Mount Vernon.  By the time he died in 1799, he had expanded the plantation from 2,000 to 8,000 acres consisting of five farms, with more than 3,000 acres under cultivation.

In June of 1775, Congress commissioned George Washington to take command of the Continental Army.  He wrote home to Martha that he expected to return safely to her in the fall. This command eventually kept him away from Mount Vernon for more than 8 years!

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I think most people have the impression that The Revolution was won by 1776…, but that’s not the case.  The American Revolution from Britain was not decided for 8 years…, not until 1783.

It was a command for which his military background, although greater than that of any of the other available candidates, hardly prepared him. His knowledge lay in frontier warfare, involving relatively small numbers of soldiers. He had no practical experience maneuvering large formations, handling cavalry or artillery, or maintaining supply lines adequate to support thousands of men in the field. He learned on the job; and although his army reeled from one misfortune to another, he had the courage, determination, and mental agility to keep the American cause one step ahead of complete disintegration until he figured out how to win the unprecedented revolutionary struggle he was leading.

His task was not overwhelming at first. The British position in Boston was indefensible, and in March 1776 they withdrew from the city. But it was only a temporary respite.

In June a new bigger and badder British army, under the command of Sir William Howe, arrived in the colonies with orders to take New York City. Howe commanded the largest expeditionary force Britain had ever sent overseas.

Defending New York was almost impossible. An island city, New York is surrounded by a maze of waterways that gave a substantial advantage to an attacker with naval superiority. Howe’s army was larger, better equipped, and far better trained than Washington’s. They defeated Washington’s army at Long Island in August and routed the Americans a few weeks later at Kip’s Bay, resulting in the loss of the city. Forced to retreat northward, Washington was defeated again at White Plains. The American defense of New York City came to a humiliating conclusion on November 16, 1776, with the surrender of Fort Washington and some 2,800 men. Washington ordered his army to retreat across New Jersey. The remains of his forces, mud-soaked and exhausted, crossed the Delaware River into Pennsylvania on December 7.

It was not looking good, to say the least, for Washington and the dying dream of a free country.

Washington and his rag-tag bunch of upstarts were facing, unquestionably, the best military there was in the world.

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Let’s also not forget that many of Washington’s own countrymen were British loyalists as well.  This revolution against Britain was definitely not a unanimous effort.

No one at the time could have seriously thought Washington and his army had any real chance at all of defeating the British…, except Washington himself.

The British had good reason to believe that the American rebellion would be over in a few months and that Congress would seek peace rather than face complete subjugation of the colonies. The enlistments of most of Washington’s army were due to expire at the end of December. However, instead of crushing the remains of Washington’s army, Howe went into winter quarters, with advanced garrisons at Trenton and Princeton, leaving Washington open to execute one of the most daring military operations in American history.

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On Christmas night Washington’s troops crossed the Delaware and attacked the unsuspecting British garrison at Trenton, forcing it to surrender. A few days later Washington again crossed the Delaware, outmaneuvered the force sent to crush him, and fell on the enemy at Princeton, inflicting a humiliating loss on the British.

Next…, General Washington and his newfound French allies decided to strike at the British army under Cornwallis, which was camped at Yorktown, Virginia. Washington’s planning for the Battle of Yorktown was as bold as it had been for Trenton and Princeton but on a much larger scale. On October 19, 1781, he accepted the surrender of Cornwallis’ army. Although two more years passed before a peace treaty was completed, the victory at Yorktown effectively brought the Revolutionary War to an end.

To the world’s amazement (I told you he was amazing!), Washington had prevailed over the bigger, better supplied, and more experienced British army.

The truly “underdog” Americans had defeated the mighty British Empire.

On December 23, 1783, General Washington presented himself before Congress in Annapolis, Maryland, and resigned his commission. Like Cincinnatus, the hero of Classical Rome, whose conduct he most admired, Washington had the integrity and character to relinquish his power when he could have been crowned a king. He left Annapolis and went home to Mount Vernon with the intention of never again serving in public life.

This single act, without precedent in modern history, made him an international hero.

How many men would turn down an offer to be king?

Would you turn down an offer to be king or queen?

This goes to show you how revered and respected George Washington was.  The colonies had just got done fighting a war to gain their freedom from a king…, and now they were willing to entrust Washington completely with their future and install him as their new king.

Amazing.

Although Washington longed for a peaceful life at Mount Vernon, the affairs of the nation continued to command his attention. He watched with mounting dismay as this new “union” stumbled ahead.  By 1785 Washington had concluded that change was essential. What was needed, he wrote to James Madison, was an energetic Constitution.

In 1787, Washington ended his self-imposed retirement and traveled to Philadelphia to attend a convention assembled to recommend changes to the Articles of Confederation. He was unanimously chosen (you’ll hear this term again and again) to preside over the Constitutional Convention, a job that took four months. He spoke very little at the convention, but few delegates were more determined to devise a government endowed with real energy and authority.

“My wish,” he wrote, “is that the convention may adopt no temporizing expedients but probe the defects of the Constitution to the bottom and provide a radical cure.”

After the convention adjourned, Washington’s reputation and support were essential to overcome opposition to the ratification of the proposed Constitution. He worked for months to rally support for the new instrument of government. It was a difficult struggle. Even in Washington’s native Virginia, the Constitution was ratified by a majority of only one vote.

Once the Constitution was approved, Washington hoped to retire again to private life. But when the first presidential election was held, he received a vote from every elector.

He wasn’t even trying to get elected and he got elected…, by every elector!

He remains the only President in American history to be elected by the unanimous voice of the people.

George Washington was unanimously elected President of the United States…, twice.

Unanimously elected!

Like I said…, amazing.

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Washington served two terms as President. His first term (1789-1793) was occupied primarily with organizing the executive branch of the new government and establishing administrative procedures that would make it possible for the government to operate with the energy and efficiency he believed were essential to the republic’s future. An astute judge of talent, he surrounded himself with the most able men in the new nation. He appointed his former aide, Alexander Hamilton, as Secretary of the Treasury; Thomas Jefferson as Secretary of State; and his former artillery chief, Henry Knox, as Secretary of War.  James Madison was also one of his principal advisors.

In his First Inaugural Address, Washington confessed that he was unpracticed in the duties of civil administration; however, he was one of the most able administrators ever to serve as President. He administered the government with fairness and integrity, assuring Americans that the President could exercise extensive executive authority without corruption. Further, he executed the laws with restraint, establishing precedents for broad-ranging presidential authority. His integrity was without question.  Thomas Jefferson wrote, “His justice is the most inflexible I have ever known, no motive of interest or consanguinity [ancestry], friendship, or hatred, being able to bias his decision.” Washington set a standard for presidential integrity rarely met by his successors, although he established an ideal by which they all are judged.

Growing partisanship within the government also concerned Washington. Washington despised political partisanship but could do little to slow the development of political parties.

Again, he demonstrated his wisdom and his purity of intention.

George was Godly man.  He believed America existed because of God’s will, and that it could not survive without God’s continued influence.

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He wasn’t concerned with personal power or any other ulterior motives.  His only concern was doing what he felt was best for his country.  Other people recognized this, and his intentions could not be questioned.  That is why he commanded such respect.

During his first term Washington toured the northern and southern states and found that the new government enjoyed the general support of the American people. Convinced that the government could get along without him, he planned to step down at the end of his first term. But his cabinet members convinced him that he alone could command the respect of members of both burgeoning political parties. Thomas Jefferson visited Washington at Mount Vernon to urge him to accept a second term. Although longing to return home permanently, Washington reluctantly agreed.

Washington’s second term (1793-1797) was dominated by foreign affairs and marred by a deepening partisanship in his own administration. One of Washington’s most important accomplishments was keeping the United States out of war, giving the new nation an opportunity to grow in strength while establishing the principle of neutrality that shaped American foreign policy for more than a century.

Washington’s Farewell Address helped to summarize many of Washington’s strongest held beliefs about what it would take to sustain and grow the young nation that he helped found.

Finally retired from public service, George and Martha Washington returned to their beloved Mount Vernon. Unfortunately for Washington, his time at the estate would be short lived.

On Thursday, December 12, 1799, George recognized the onset of a sore throat and became increasingly hoarse. Only two days later, between ten and eleven at night on December 14, 1799, George Washington passed away from some sort of throat infection.  He was surrounded by people who were close to him including his wife who sat at the foot of his bed.

So there you have it…, the amazing life of an amazing man…, George Washington.

General George Washington.

President George Washington.

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Although I believe he would have just been happy to have been recognized as a gentleman and a loyal American citizen.

So, what do you think now?  Do you agree with me that there would not have been a United States, as we have come to know it, without George Washington?

I don’t think you can help but agree.

We were very blessed to have George on our team…, and God on our side!

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Thank you to mountvernon.org for contributing to this article.

 

I value your feedback and I’d love to hear from you!

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Reading George Washington’s Farewell Address, on the floor of the Senate, is an annual tradition.

Do you recall what “party” George Washington represented?  Was he a Democrat?  Was he a Republican?  I believe he was neither.  I believe he would only classify himself as an “American.”

He was “the father” of of our nation, and he loved it like it was his child.  Let’s be clear about this…, there would be no United States of America if it were not for George Washington.

President Washington’s integrity and patriotism were unquestioned.  His only desire was to do what was best for his country and its citizens.  It is in this regard that I feel President Trump has a lot in common with our country’s first president.

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We all know that President Trump is technically a Republican, but do you really think his party affiliation is paramount to him?  I don’t think so.  I don’t think he’d have any problem being recognized as a Democrat, or working with Democrats, if they were joining with him in trying to do what was best for the country or We the People.

According to Chad Pergram of Fox News, “Senator Deb Fischer, R-Nebraska, will follow an annual tradition when the Senate next convenes.  The first order of business is for Fischer to read George Washington’s Farewell Address aloud on the floor.”

I wonder how many Senators will be there in the Senate to actually hear the reading?  Pergram says, “Most senators will be jetting back to the Beltway after the Presidents’ Day recess, not yet on the ground to hear Fischer’s presentation.”

George Washington’s complete Farewell Address is 32 handwritten pages.  I encourage you to read it sometime.  Below you’ll find sections of his address which I have selected for one reason or another, along with my own comments.

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President Washington begins by addressing his “Friends and fellow citizens,”

“The period for a new election of a citizen, to administer the executive government of the United States, being not far distant, and the time actually arrived, when your thoughts must be employed designating the person, who is to be clothed with that important trust, it appears to me proper, especially as it may conduce to a more distinct expression of the public voice, that I should now apprize you of the resolution I have formed, to decline being considered among the number of those out of whom a choice is to be made.”

Washington’s second term is up, but he does not want another term, although he would almost unanimously be voted in.

“The unity of Government, which constitutes you one people, is also now dear to you. It is justly so; for it is a main pillar in the edifice of your real independence, the support of your tranquility at home, your peace abroad; of your safety; of your prosperity; of that very Liberty, which you so highly prize.”

Washington observes that the American people value and hold dear their new, unique, form of government.

“But as it is easy to foresee, that, from different causes and from different quarters, much pains will be taken, many artifices employed, to weaken in your minds the conviction of this truth; as this is the point in your political fortress against which the batteries of internal and external enemies will be most constantly and actively (though often covertly and insidiously) directed, it is of infinite moment, that you should properly estimate the immense value of your national Union to your collective and individual happiness; that you should cherish a cordial, habitual, and immovable attachment to it; accustoming yourselves to think and speak of it as of the Palladium of your political safety and prosperity; watching for its preservation with jealous anxiety; discountenancing whatever may suggest even a suspicion, that it can in any event be abandoned; and indignantly frowning upon the first dawning of every attempt to alienate any portion of our country from the rest, or to enfeeble the sacred ties which now link together the various parts.”

President Washington warns, however, that our government and our freedoms will come under attack from within our own country and from the outside, and that we must “cherish” and protect our way of life.

“The name of American, which belongs to you, in your national capacity, must always exalt the just pride of Patriotism, more than any appellation derived from local discriminations. With slight shades of difference, you have the same religion, manners, habits, and political principles. You have in a common cause fought and triumphed together; the Independence and Liberty you possess are the work of joint counsels, and joint efforts, of common dangers, sufferings, and successes.”

Washington says we should be proud to be called an American.  He also points out what they all had in common at the time.  This definitely is not the case anymore with most “Americans.”

“All obstructions to the execution of the Laws, all combinations and associations, under whatever plausible character, with the real design to direct, control, counteract, or awe the regular deliberation and action of the constituted authorities, are destructive of this fundamental principle, and of fatal tendency. They serve to organize faction, to give it an artificial and extraordinary force; to put, in the place of the delegated will of the nation, the will of a party, often a small but artful and enterprising minority of the community; and, according to the alternate triumphs of different parties, to make the public administration the mirror of the ill-concerted and incongruous projects of faction, rather than the organ of consistent and wholesome plans digested by common counsels, and modified by mutual interests.”

Washington warns here of the dangers of “factions” and “enterprising minorities” putting their wants ahead of what is best for the nation as a whole.

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“I have already intimated to you the danger of parties in the state, with particular reference to the founding of them on geographical discriminations. Let me now take a more comprehensive view, and warn you in the most solemn manner against the baneful effects of the spirit of party, generally.”

“This spirit, unfortunately, is inseparable from our nature, having its root in the strongest passions of the human mind. It exists under different shapes in all governments, more or less stifled, controlled, or repressed; but, in those of the popular form, it is seen in its greatest rankness, and is truly their worst enemy.”

“The alternate domination of one faction over another, sharpened by the spirit of revenge, natural to party dissension, which in different ages and countries has perpetrated the most horrid enormities, is itself a frightful despotism. But this leads at length to a more formal and permanent despotism. The disorders and miseries, which result, gradually incline the minds of men to seek security and repose in the absolute power of an individual; and sooner or later the chief of some prevailing faction, more able or more fortunate than his competitors, turns this disposition to the purposes of his own elevation, on the ruins of Public Liberty.”

Are the results of putting party ahead of country not deteriorating our liberty on a daily basis?

“Without looking forward to an extremity of this kind, (which nevertheless ought not to be entirely out of sight,) the common and continual mischiefs of the spirit of party are sufficient to make it the interest and duty of a wise people to discourage and restrain it.”

Washington advises us to keep our eyes open, to be aware of those who would threaten our liberty and our country, and to fight against them and their efforts.

“It serves always to distract the Public Councils, and enfeeble the Public Administration. It agitates the Community with ill-founded jealousies and false alarms; kindles the animosity of one part against another, foments occasionally riot and insurrection. It opens the door to foreign influence and corruption, which find a facilitated access to the government itself through the channels of party passions. Thus the policy and the will of one country are subjected to the policy and will of another.”

“There is an opinion, that parties in free countries are useful checks upon the administration of the Government, and serve to keep alive the spirit of Liberty. This within certain limits is probably true; and in Governments of a Monarchical cast, Patriotism may look with indulgence, if not with favor, upon the spirit of party. But in those of the popular character, in Governments purely elective, it is a spirit not to be encouraged. From their natural tendency, it is certain there will always be enough of that spirit for every salutary purpose. And, there being constant danger of excess, the effort ought to be, by force of public opinion, to mitigate and assuage it. A fire not to be quenched, it demands a uniform vigilance to prevent its bursting into a flame, lest, instead of warming, it should consume.”

We have to stay on top of these people who attempt to sway our fellow citizens into forgetting why our country was formed and pretend to have a better way, while trying to drive a wedge between our citizens and between our citizens and their country.

“Against the insidious wiles of foreign influence (I conjure you to believe me, fellow-citizens,) the jealousy of a free people ought to be constantly awake; since history and experience prove, that foreign influence is one of the most baneful foes of Republican Government. But that jealousy, to be useful, must be impartial; else it becomes the instrument of the very influence to be avoided, instead of a defense against it. Excessive partiality for one foreign nation, and excessive dislike of another, cause those whom they actuate to see danger only on one side, and serve to veil and even second the arts of influence on the other. Real patriots, who may resist the intrigues of the favorite, are liable to become suspected and odious; while its tools and dupes usurp the applause and confidence of the people, to surrender their interests.”

No matter what other foreign governments may say, they do not have our best interests at heart unless it benefits them.  We must put America first and guard her interests.

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“The great rule of conduct for us, in regard to foreign nations, is, in extending our commercial relations, to have with them as little political connection as possible. So far as we have already formed engagements, let them be fulfilled with perfect good faith.  Here let us stop.”

“Taking care always to keep ourselves, by suitable establishments, on a respectable defensive posture, we may safely trust to temporary alliances for extraordinary emergencies.”

“In offering to you, my countrymen, these counsels of an old and affectionate friend, I dare not hope they will make the strong and lasting impression I could wish; that they will control the usual current of the passions, or prevent our nation from running the course, which has hitherto marked the destiny of nations. But, if I may even flatter myself, that they may be productive of some partial benefit, some occasional good; that they may now and then recur to moderate the fury of party spirit, to warn against the mischiefs of foreign intrigue, to guard against the impostures of pretended patriotism; this hope will be a full recompense for the solicitude for your welfare, by which they have been dictated.

George Washington, United States – September 17, 1796

Source: “The Independent Chronicle” newspaper, September 26, 1796.

 

You have to love George Washington.  He was a great leader and an eloquent communicator.

I wonder what he would do with “Twitter” today?

What would he have to say about “the fake news?”

What would he say about this growing support of Socialism and “open borders?”

I believe President Trump is representing President Washington’s beliefs quite well for the time being.

 

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