Should taxpayers get a rebate for schools that aren’t open?

I believe this is a valid and an honest question.

If you pay local property taxes on your home or business, the lion’s share of what you pay goes towards funding your local schools.

Taxpayers pay these school taxes, whether they have school-aged children or not, in order to guarantee the children in their community receive an education, and eventually, hopefully, become intelligent and productive members of society…, at least until they go to college.

If our local governments decide to close our schools, should we still be paying for them?

If they decided to discontinue garbage collection, would you still be forced to pay for that?

Just sayin’.

It really doesn’t matter if you think the schools should be closed or not.

It really doesn’t matter whether your local government is “following the science” or not. 

If the children of our community are not receiving the education we are paying for (and I’m sorry, but this distance learning crap doesn’t count), why shouldn’t the taxpayers get at least a percentage (a big percentage) of the money back that they paid?

Why should teachers get paid for a job they aren’t doing?

Why should the local school district be paid for the upkeep, utilities, and support staffs for buildings our children aren’t using?

And, again, I’m sorry, but this distance learning crap doesn’t count.

No wonder why the teachers are hesitant about going back to work, like in Chicago.

Why go back when you can use COVID as a ready-made excuse, and continue to be paid for doing next to nothing?

Why go back when all of the “the scientists” in the teachers’ unions are overriding the scientists from the CDC (Center for Disease Control)?

Now I’ve heard that the Biden administration considers a school “re-opened” if they hold classes one day a week. 

If you say so, Illegitimate Joe.

This was one of the Biden administration’s “clarifications” of their official policy.

That’s funny, because only a month ago these “clarifications” were called lies.  

If it’s one thing we have learned, it’s that “it’s all about the money,” and not “all about the kids.”  

If the teachers stopped getting paid, and the school districts stopped getting their share of the money, the schools would be reopening so fast it would make your head spin!

Of course, hell would freeze over before a penny of taxpayer money was ever returned to the taxpayers.

That being said, there are many taxpayers across our country who really should be receiving some of their hard-earned money back.

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My, how things have changed.

In the beginning, the states pretty much ruled themselves.  They were like their own separate, little, “countries.” 

But they were connected to each other, physically, economically, and ideologically.   

They recognized the value of banding together for protection internationally and the value of being able to deal with other countries as a single, united, entity.  

So, the states created The Constitution to spell out how this collection of states would function under a single federal government umbrella.

They had no idea how immense and all-encompassing and all-controlling that federal “umbrella” would become.   

Lenore T. Adkins, for the “ShareAmerica” website, writes, ‘“We do need a State Department. We do need a Department of Defense,’ says Karla Jones, director of international relations and federalism at the American Legislative Exchange Council, referring to the federal entities responsible for implementing the country’s foreign and defense policies.”

“The U.S. relies on a system called ‘federalism:’ Powers not granted to the federal government are reserved for the states and the people. It’s an important concept to understand because citizens encounter different levels of government daily, but in several ways.”

It’s also important to recognize that the federal government seems to be expanding its “powers,” and encroaching on states’ rights more and more all the time.

So, what does the federal government do?

Better said, what does the federal government do that we and the states have allowed it to do?

“Only the federal government can regulate interstate and foreign commerce, declare war and set taxing, spending and other national policies.”

But the federal government has accumulated power exponentially over the years.  Power that it was never intended to have.

Let’s take a look at our federal government and how grotesquely “obese” it has become.

Here is a list of the major departments that the federal government is broken into, along with their number of employees, their annual budgets, how many subsidiaries they have and some of the highlights of what they do: 

Department of State

Employees: 69,000

Budget: $52.404 billion

Includes 62 different offices and bureaus, including the Office of Global Intergovernmental Affairs, the Office of Civil Rights, the Office of Global Women’s Issues, and the Bureau of Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs.   

Department of the Treasury

Employees: 86,049

Budget: $20 billion

Includes 17 different offices and bureaus, including the IRS and the federal mints. 

Department of Defense

Employees: 2.86 million     

Budget: $721.5 billion

Includes 23 different agencies and departments, including the Army, Navy and Air Force, and also the National Security Agency.

Department of Justice

Employees: 113,543

Budget: $29.9 billion

Includes 47 different offices and bureaus, including the Office of the Attorney General, Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), the United States Marshals Service, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF), and the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA). The department is also responsible for running the federal prison system.

Department of the Interior

Employees: 70,003

Budget: $20.7 billion

Includes 62 different offices and bureaus, including the Office of Emergency Management (OEM), the National Parks Service, the Office of Indian Affairs, and the Bureau of Land Management.  NASA (The National Aeronautics and Space Administration) technically falls under the Department of the Interior, although it is an independent agency of the U.S. Federal Government responsible for the civilian space program, as well as aeronautics and space research.

Department of Agriculture

Employees: 105,778

Budget: $155 billion

Includes 20 different offices and agencies, including the Farm Service Agency, the Food Safety and Inspection Service, and the United States Forest Service. 

Department of Commerce

Employees: 43,880

Budget: $9.67 billion

Includes 16 different bureaus and services, including the International Trade Administration, the Bureau of the Census, the Patent and Trademark Office, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the National Weather Service.

Department of Labor

Employees: 17,450

Budget: $12.1 billion

Includes 30 different offices and administrations, including the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the Office of Workers’ Compensation Programs, and Job Corps.

Department of Health and Human Services

Employees: 79,540

Budget: $1.286 trillion

Includes 22 different centers, offices and agencies, including the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Department of Housing and Urban Development

Employees: 8,416

Budget: $32.6 billion

Includes 11 different offices, including the Office of Equal Employment Opportunity, the Office of Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity, and the Center for Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships (HUD).

Department of Transportation

Employees: 58,622

Budget: $75.1 billion

Includes 11 different offices and administrations, including the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the Federal Highway Administration, the Federal Railroad Administration, and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

Department of Energy

Employees: 12,944

Budget: $27.9 billion

Includes 12 different offices, administrations and programs, including the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, the National Nuclear Security Administration, the Cybersecurity, Energy Security and Emergency Response program, and the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program.

Department of Education

Employees: 3,912

Budget: $68 billion

Includes 19 different offices, boards and councils, including the President’s Advisory Board on Historically Black Colleges and Universities, the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, the National Assessment Governing Board, the Office of Federal Student Aid, and the Office of Elementary and Secondary Education.

Department of Veterans Affairs

Employees: 383,040

Budget: $180 billion

Includes 5 different administrations and offices, including the Veterans Health Administration, the Veterans Benefits Administration, the National Cemetery Administration, and the Veteran Employment Services Office.

Department of Homeland Security

Employees: 229,000

Budget: $51.672 billion

Includes 15 different agencies and offices, including the U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency, the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the U.S. Coast Guard, and the U.S. Secret Service. 

Then we spend over $8 billion dollars to fund and operate Congress and the Senate per year.  This is for 535 members of Congress and staff members of over 13,000.

We also spend over $7 billion to fund the federal Judiciary per year.  The federal judiciary has over 30,000 employees.

Lastly, we have expenses for The White House, The White House staff (377) and for The President and The Vice-President, which run around $100 million annually.

That’s a total of:

372 different agencies, offices, bureaus, programs and administrations…,

Representing 4,185,091 (that’s over 4 million) total employees and elected officials…,

At a total cost of $2.867 trillion (that $8,600 annually for every man, woman and child).  Now think about how many people don’t pay federal income tax.  That $8,600 goes up pretty quick for the rest of us.

Wow.  Those are some staggering numbers!

And that’s just to support our federal government’s operations. 

We’re not even talking about how much we pay to fund our state and local governments as well!

Remember, these are only the federal government’s costs of doing business.

This does not include the taxes collected and then redistributed back to the American people [and people here illegally] monetarily, or in some other form of value, like infrastructure, housing, etc.  

Please note:  In American public finance, discretionary spending is government spending implemented through an appropriations bill. This spending is an optional part of fiscal policy, in contrast to entitlement programs (non-discretionary) for which funding is mandatory and determined by the number of eligible recipients.

Please be aware that there were only three original departments created back in 1789, the State Department, the Treasury Department, and the War Department, which evolved into the Department of Defense.   

All of the other departments were created at much later dates.

The Department of the Interior was created in 1849, followed by the Department of Agriculture in 1862.

Next was the Department of Justice in 1870, followed by the Department of Labor in 1913.  

1913 was also the first year for federal income tax as we know it.  We’ll talk more about taxes later.

In 1937 the Department of commerce was created, followed by the Department of Health and Human Services in 1953.  

After this is when the federal government really started to balloon.

The Department of Housing and Urban Development was created in 1965.

The Department of Transportation was created in 1967.

Department of Energy in 1977.

Department of Education in 1979.

Department of Veteran’s Affairs in 1989.

And the Department of Homeland Security in 2002.    

I mentioned earlier we’d get to talking about taxes…, well, here we are.

Here is the history of federal taxes:

In order to help pay for its war effort in the American Civil War, Congress imposed its first personal income tax in 1861.  It was part of the Revenue Act of 1861 (3% of all incomes over $800, rescinded in 1872). Congress also enacted the Revenue Act of 1862, which levied a 3% tax on incomes above $600, rising to 5% for incomes above $10,000. Rates were raised in 1864. This income tax was then repealed in 1872.

So, at this point, we’re back to no federal income taxes.

Forty-one years later, the 16th Amendment was ratified in 1913, which states:

“The Congress shall have the power to lay and collect taxes on incomes, from whatever source derived, without apportionment among the several States, and without regard to any census or enumeration.”

So, now the taxation gravy train was off and running!

Congress then enacted an income tax in October 1913 as part of the Revenue Act of 1913, levying a 1% tax on net personal incomes above $3,000, with a 6% surtax on incomes above $500,000.

By 1918, the top rate of the income tax was increased to 77% (on income over $1,000,000, equivalent of $16,717,815 in 2018 dollars to finance World War I. The average rate for the rich however, was 15%.

During World War II, Congress introduced payroll withholding and quarterly tax payments.

A comedic representation by Clifford K. Berryman of the debate to introduce a sales tax in the United States in 1933 and end the income tax.

I have personally argued my support of a a national sales tax (or a consumption tax) as opposed to a federal income tax. Please see my prior blogs on this subject.

At first, the income tax was incrementally expanded by Congress, and then inflation automatically raised most persons into tax brackets formerly reserved for the wealthy until income tax brackets were adjusted for inflation. Income tax now applies to almost two-thirds of the population. The lowest-earning workers, especially those with dependents, pay no income taxes as a group and actually get a small subsidy from the federal government because of child credits and the Earned Income Tax Credit.

While the government was originally funded via tariffs upon imported goods, tariffs now represent only a minor portion of federal revenues.

In the 1930s, the New Deal introduced Social Security to rectify the first three problems (retirement, injury-induced disability, or congenital disability). It introduced the FICA tax as the means to pay for Social Security.

In the 1960s, Medicare was introduced to rectify the fourth problem (health care for the elderly). The FICA tax was increased in order to pay for this expense.

The total federal budget for 2020 is $4.79 trillion, but we ALWAYS spend more than what we budget. That’s why our federal deficit is in the neighborhood of $26 trillion right now…, but that’s another blog for another day.

Remember I mentioned there are over 4 million total employees and elected officials employed by the federal government…, and more than half of these politicians and bureaucrats live in Washington DC and the surrounding areas of Maryland and northern Virginia.

These areas see a consistent voter registration rate of 90-95% democrat and only 5% republican.

When you hear the term “deep state,” this is what they’re referring to. 

A bureaucratic workforce that is loyal to the democrat party, regardless of who the American people choose to run the country.

The “deep state” is into self-preservation and expanding itself (bigger government).  That is why they have hitched their wagon to the democrat party, and why you can always expect the democrats to pretend to solve any issue by throwing more government, and more of our money, at it.     

“Here endeth the lesson,” as Sean Connery said, when he played a Gman in “The Untouchables.” 

That’s when being a Gman was still an honorable profession!

RIP Sean Connery.

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The choice is really quite simple.

Our presidential election is only a few weeks away. 

We have the choice between the democrat/liberal, Joe Biden, and the republican/conservative, Donald Trump.

Yes, we have to vote for one of these two men, but we also need to consider what these two men represent.

Let’s review what you apparently support by voting for either the democrat/liberal, Joe Biden, or the republican/conservative, Donald Trump.

Democrats/liberals believe it is a woman’s right to abort a baby right up to the moment before birth.

Republicans/conservatives believe all babies have a right to be born and live. 

Democrats/liberals support defunding police departments.  All criminals are fans of this!

Republicans/conservatives believe if anything, police department support needs to be increased.

Democrats/liberals support taking guns away from law abiding citizens. Again, all criminals are fans of this!

Republicans/conservatives believe law abiding citizens have the right to protect themselves and bear arms, as guaranteed in The Constitution.

Democrats/liberals believe anyone from anywhere should be able to freely walk right into our country whenever they feel like it.  The drug cartels and human traffickers love this.

Republicans/conservatives believe our borders should be secure, limiting who can and who can’t come in at any given time, while affording us an orderly and managed legal immigration process.

Democrats/liberals believe in tearing down monuments to our history as a country.

Republicans/conservatives believe in honoring and learning from our history, not trying to erase it.

Democrats/liberals support “sanctuary” cities and states, where illegal immigrants can live without fear of being taken into Federal custody and charged with crimes or be deported.

Republicans/conservatives believe illegal immigrants are “illegal” and are here illegally, and should be treated as such. Republicans/conservatives also believe that the concerns of legal citizens should come before those of illegal immigrants.  

Democrats/liberals support raising taxes across the board.  They claim working class people won’t be affected, but we all know higher tax rates for companies and corporations are just passed down to us.

Republicans/conservatives support the continued reduction of taxes across the board.

Democrats/liberals immediately take money from the military at their earliest opportunity, weakening our nation’s defense.

Republicans/conservatives believe a strong military is an absolute necessity in today’s global environment.  The defense of our country is also the federal government’s primary responsibility per The Constitution.

…   

Democrats/liberals love implementing a seemingly never-ending list of federal regulations designed to suffocate construction, business operations, and whatever else they can think of to stifle our civil liberties.

Republicans/conservatives believe some regulations are necessary, but that less regulation is preferable in order promote businesses and maintain a strong economy.  

… 

Democrats/liberals feel it is a good idea to allow anyone living in our country to vote, regardless of whether they are here legally or not, and regardless of whether the voter has any proper ID to prove who they are.  

Republicans/conservatives believe only legal citizens should be allowed to vote, and that an ID should be required.

Democrats/liberals believe that government should be the “end all be all” for anyone living in America.

Republicans/conservatives believe that government is a “necessary evil,” and that most things are done more efficiently and cheaper by the private sector.

Democrats/liberals believe in a person’s dependence on government, and that having some form of a socialist government is more desirable that our capitalist system, even though no socialist government in the past can be pointed to as a successful government.  

Republicans/conservatives believe in our capitalist way of doing things, providing for ourselves as a rule, and system which allows individuals to rise to any level of success, dependent on the individuals’ desire to attain it.

 … 

Democrats/liberals believe in free speech as long as your speech agrees with their beliefs, if not, they have no problem with censoring or silencing you.  

Republicans/conservatives believe in the 1st Amendment, and that everyone has a right to their own opinions and that they have a right to voice those opinions. 

Democrats/liberals believe rioting, burning, and looting are acceptable forms of “peaceful protesting.”  They believe in deferring to the desires of “the mob” as opposed to following the law.

Republicans/conservatives believe in law and order, and that no one has the right to harm other people or their property as part of their “protest.”

Democrats/liberals prefer to operate in a way that highlights a person’s racial identity, gender identity, or sexual preference above all else…, except their political leaning.  

Republicans/conservatives prefer to identify people by the quality of their character and by their actions and beliefs, without concern for race, color, or creed.

Democrats/liberals believe the United States’ industry, people and economy need to be punished and restricted due to “climate change,” while the rest of the world is allowed to keep right on polluting and taking advantage of us.

Republicans/conservatives believe if “climate change” is real, it wasn’t caused by us and we have no real way of affecting “climate change” one way or the other.

Democrats/liberals believe fossil fuels are evil and need to be done away with.  

Republicans/conservatives believe fossil fuels are still the energy souce of choice right now, at least until other options become viable. Republicans/consrvatives like the US having energy independence, not having to rely on the Middle East for anything, contolling our own energy pricing.

Democrats/liberals believe it’s okay for the “media” to operate as an arm of the democrat party, reporting only things that support their narrative, while attacking republicans/conservatives, and especially President Trump on a daily basis.  

Republicans/conservatives believe the “media” should report from an unbiased point of view, acting as a watchdog against all government improprieties, regardless of which party it is. 

And what about the economy?

Democrats/liberals point to the economy after China, and the democrats I believe, dropped the coronavirus bomb on us.  

Republicans/conservatives point the hottest economy in history, prior to the China virus, and believe President Trump can get our econmy humming again. Without the release of “The virus,” the democrats would not have stood a chance in this election.  

So, like I said in the beginning, “The choice is really quite simple.”  

The differences between democrats/liberals and republicans/conservatives have never been more obvious. 

The question is which side are you on?

If you’re having a hard time deciding who to vote for, you are obviously one confused individual!

There should be no undecided voters at this point. 

If you really are undecided, then maybe you shouldn’t even bother voting.

Just sayin’.       

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I’d love to hear from you!

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As far as support for educating our children goes…, actions (and money) speak louder than words.

No one would deny that educating our children properly and effectively should be one our society’s highest priorities.

Right?

I mean, every election cycle, isn’t “education” always a hot topic?

Isn’t the education of the country’s children a priority?

Many of us talk a good “education” game, but then when it comes to putting money where our mouths are, we drop the ball.

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We can talk about the importance of “education” all we want…, but the numbers don’t lie.

If we value “education,” then don’t we have to value our teachers as well?

After all, what is “education” without teachers?

Effective learning and effective teaching go hand in hand.

But the numbers don’t lie…, and apparently, we don’t value our teachers very much at all.

If we look at the top 25 paying jobs in America, per the Glassdoor website, we won’t find any teaching jobs here.

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But they must be fairly close to making the top 25 list, right?

I mean in order to even be hired as a teacher, a bachelor’s degree in “Education” is required, along with a “teachable” minor degree. State competency tests must be passed, and a background check must be passed as well, before someone can then be “certified” as a “teacher.”

On-going professional training and college level courses must then be completed prior to being re-certified every five years.

Note: Glassdoor is a website where current and former employees anonymously review companies. Glassdoor also allows users to anonymously submit and view salaries as well as search and apply for jobs on its platform.

So where do teachers come in?

Well, according to the United States Department of Labor, with data as of 2018, the highest ranking teaching position would be a college law professor.  Ranking at number 37, with an average annual salary of $130,710.

Next on their list would be a college medical professor.  Ranking at number 46, and averaging $122,320 annually.

We continue to see more college level positions scattered throughout the next 64 positions…, which then brings us to Elementary and Secondary Education Administrators, ranked at 110, earning $98,750 annually.

But that’s the “Administrators.”

So our regular old “school teachers” should be coming up soon, right?

As we continue through the list, I don’t see them as we go all the way down to number 200.

I then continue down the list, and I still don’t see teachers listed in the top 300!

Then finally…, there…, all the way down at position 370 are our elementary and secondary teachers, with an average yearly salary of $62,200.

Yes folks…, we value our children’s education so much that we are willing to pay their teachers an average of $62K per year.

We value our children’s education so much that their teacher’s salary ranks 370th on the list of highest paying jobs in our country, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.

370th!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

It’s hard to believe isn’t it?

But the numbers don’t lie.

But 370th?!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

That means that there are 369 jobs out there that are apparently more valuable than being a teacher.

Off the top of your head…, could you list 10-15 jobs more important, or more difficult than being a teacher?

How about 15-25 jobs more important, or more difficult than being a teacher?

How about 100 jobs?!

200 jobs?!

300 jobs?!

369 jobs?!

Well, I think you get my point.

Teachers being ranked at number 370 on this list is absolutely ridiculous and a slap in the face to all of our teachers out there.

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I have to admit that I have personally been an elementary teacher and a high school teacher in my life, so I do carry some bias here…,

But number 370?!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Seriously?!

Believe me, it’s not easy managing the behavior of a classroom full of kids, while managing to instruct them across a curriculum with multiple subjects, not to mention all of the life lessons teachers impart regarding communicating, getting along with others, manners, etc.

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And many, many teachers have to pay for many of their own classroom supplies and snacks on top of it!

And yet, some individuals will still say that teachers are overpaid!!!!

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Yes…, some say that Teachers’ salaries are driving up their taxes…, and that they only work 9 or 10 months a year on top of it!

Some people feel that Teachers are just glorified babysitters and that they should be paid as such.

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Okay…, well, let’s look at this scenario and see how much money we’d all save!

We can get a “babysitter” for way less than minimum wage, right?

That’s right!  Let’s give these “teachers” $3.00 an hour, which isn’t bad at all for your average babysitter…, and only for the hours they actually are in class; not any of that silly planning time, or any time they spend before or after school on grading papers, attending special programs, parent conferences, or running clubs or coaching sports.

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That would come to $19.50 a day (7:45 A.M. to 3:00 P.M., with 45 min. off for lunch and planning.  That equals 6 1/2 hours).  Each parent should pay $19.50 a day for these teachers to baby-sit their children.

Now how many students do they teach in a day…maybe 30?  So that’s $19.50 x 30 = $585.00 a day.

However, remember they only work 180 days a year!!!

Aha!!!

We’re not going to pay these teachers for any vacation days!

So, let’s see…, that’s $585 X 180 then, or…, $105,300 per year?

Wait…, what?!  That can’t be right!  That’s way more than their making now!

How could that be?!

(That would move teachers all the way up the list to number 83!  That’s much better, but still quite low in comparison.)

But wait!

What about those special education teachers and the ones with Master’s degrees?

Well, we could be extra generous and pay them minimum wage ($7.75), you know…, like if they worked at Taco Bell or McDonald’s, and just to be fair, round it off to $8.00 an hour. That would be $8.00 X 6 1/2 hours X 30 children X 180 days = $280,800 per year!

I think we just lost a few of our complaining taxpayers!

I also think it’s time for us as a nation to get serious about our children’s education.

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How should taxes be ideally collected?  

I believe that no taxes should be taken out of our paychecks.

None.

I believe that taxing based on whether you get a paycheck or not is discriminatory.

I believe the tax rates and certain tax considerations are discriminatory as well.

All money should be collected from national and state sales taxes, along with some other usage taxes and fees.

Things would cost a little more, but we’d have more money to spend as well.

These taxes would be inherently fair because those who spent more money would pay more taxes, and those who liked doing certain things would pay for those things.

Also, people hiding from income taxes, like illegal workers and “cash” workers, would now be paying their fair share.

Corporations and “the rich” would not have to worry about finding “loop holes” anymore, because there wouldn’t be any!

There would be no need for filing tax returns because there would be no deductions, and there would be no more redistribution of wealth via the tax system.  There would be no more getting a tax refund or owing taxes.  Whatever you pay in sales tax is what you pay.

Items deemed to be “necessities” would not be taxed or taxed at a lesser rate.

The only people that could possibly have a problem with this system are those wanting to rip-off our current system, those actually ripping-off our current system now, and those not paying their fair share of taxes or any taxes at all, leaving the rest of us poor honest slobs to pick-up the whole tab.

Other usage taxes would also be employed.  For example, the fuel tax would in turn pay for all things transportation related.  The more fuel you purchase, the more you use the roads, so the more you pay.  Get it?

People who participate in activities or use certain places, pay for those activities and places with associated fees.

Anything that is not self-sustainable would become unavailable.

Funding for our government, military, social security, and other essential services would come from the base sales tax and would be appropriated as they currently are.

Also, by collecting taxes this way, we are all invested in the process.  If you don’t pay any taxes you’re not really concerned with how high they are or how the taxes are being spent.

I understand that this is not a completely original idea, but the concept here as a whole is, I believe.

I’m not holding my breath for this method of tax collection to go into effect, but someday…, maybe.

Please give me some feedback and let me know what you think!

 

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“A person with options is a person with power!”

“A person with the option to take ownership of something is much richer when they decide to invest in that option of their own free will. – Mr. Erickson

What is politics in America basically about?

Politics in America is basically about people fighting to decide who will have the power to decide what we spend our money on, among other things, of course, but primarily that.

What if we took some of that power out of the equation for our politicians?

What if they were only charged with supplying the options, not the actual funding in a lot of cases?

What if we gave some of that power back to the people who are footing the bill?

You might say that could never work because how could you formulate a budget operating that way?

Well, my answer would be that the politicians have not operated within a budget for a long time anyway.  And I would be right.  The last time the Congress even passed a budget was in 2006.

Some types of basic levels of funding would have to exist for the military, government operations, etc., but the lion’s share of the spending could be deemed discretionary, and those levels determined by the desires of the taxpayers.

For example, in my state, when filling out my tax return form, I can select an amount to go towards any of the following causes: Endangered resources, Military family relief, Cancer research, Second Harvest/Feeding Americans, Veterans trust fund, Red Cross Disaster Relief, Multiple sclerosis, of the Special Olympics.

Why can’t the federal government help to fund different projects or causes the same way?

If people really want something they’ll kick-in money for it, and if they don’t, they won’t.

Why couldn’t we have the option to give additional money to a “Border wall building fund?”

Or to NASA?

Or to a “School Security” fund?

Or to a “Climate change protection fund?”

Or to a “Help the homeless fund?”

Or to an “Education improvement fund?

Think about all of the possibilities and all of the opportunities.

I feel like this would be a more productive way of spending our money.

Instead of these lobbyists wasting money on politicians, they could just directly fund their own cause.

Instead of private citizens wasting their money on supporting politicians, they could just directly fund their own favorite causes.

If you are worried about climate change, then put your money where your mouth is.

If you want a border wall built on our southern border, open up your wallet and chip in.

Having choices is good.

Being forced to pay for programs you don’t support is not good.

Let’s try doing what’s good.

 

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Thank you, MrEricksonRules.

income tax before 1913

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